Sep
22
2019
Yellow Springs
83°
clear sky
humidity: 51%
wind: 13mph SW
H 87 • L 80

Articles About Ohio EPA

  • Environmental news — EPA responds to Vernay cleanup plan

    YSI Senior Scientist Jessica Moyer displayed the flag the company received for an Ohio EPA Encouraging Environmental Excellence award at its Brannum Lane facility. YSI received the highest level — platnium —for its work to conserve resources at their facility and in the wider community. YSI, now owned by Xylem, is a 70-year-old local company that designs and manufacturers water sampling and monitoring instruments used around the globe and in the region, including by the Ohio EPA. (Photo by Megan Bachman)

    It’s been 16 years since Vernay Laboratories began working under order of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to develop a plan to clean up contamination at and around the company’s former manufacturing facility at 875 Dayton St. But Vernay has more work to do before its final cleanup plan is approved.

  • Village Council — Vernay cleanup plan probed

    Groundwater contaminated with chlorinated solvents and volatile organic compounds at levels above EPA drinking water standards from the former Vernay rubber parts manufacturing facility on Dayton Street has spread eastward across Wright Street and Suncrest Drive. Soil contamination at the site is concentrated in an area near the two former plants, where chlorinated solvents used to degrease metal parts were disposed, and at the front of a property, where a common pesticide was used. Contamination is also present in the the storm sewers (and the backfill surrounding them), which continue to transport pollutants off the property. (Map was generated using data and maps from cleanup oversight firm EHS Technology Group of Dayton)

    A member of the Yellow Springs Environmental Commission urged Village Council at its Aug. 20 meeting to weigh in on a plan to clean up a highly contaminated industrial site in the village.

  • A new plan to protect local water

    Local drinking water comes from a wellfield south of town located near the water treatment plant. The area that collects water within a five-year time-of-travel to the wellfield is known as the source water protection area. The 2001 Wellhead Protection Plan identifying this area was recently updated by the Environmental Commission, with new strategies for protecting the aquifer that is the source for local drinking water. (Source: Yellow springs Wellhead Protection Plan)

    What should the Village of Yellow Springs do to protect its water supply? Stay vigilant about pollution threats, test local water more often and educate citizens to prevent groundwater pollution, according to the Environmental Commission’s recent update of a 2001 plan.

  • Two conferences’ ‘down to earth’ topics

    Tecumseh Land Trust and the Arthur Morgan Institute for Community Solutions are hosting back-to-back conferences on land conservation and regenerative agriculture, Thursday–Friday, March 8–9, at McGregor Hall, Antioch College. The conferences are the latest partnership undertaken between TLT and Community Solutions, led respectively by Krista Magaw, left, and Susan Jennings. (Photo by Megan Bachman)

    Liken them to lichen. Two local nonprofits, akin to how algae and fungi form that symbiotic organism, are working in mutually beneficial ways to transform the local food and farming scene.

  • Public is invited — New ways to fight weeds

    The last time the Village of Yellow Springs sprayed pesticides on public land commonly used by residents was on June 12, 2013. Five years later, Village practices have changed.

  • Ohio EPA hears quarry concerns

    About 300 citizens packed the cafeteria of Greenon High School last Thursday to oppose a planned limestone quarrying project in Mad River Township, a few miles north of Yellow Springs. Ohio EPA organized the hearing, which was focused on one aspect of the project, a permit for wastewater discharge from the quarry. (Photo by Audrey Hackett)

    About 300 citizens packed the cafeteria of Greenon High School Feb. 1, voicing public opposition to a limestone quarrying plan a few miles north of Yellow Springs.

  • EPA studies vapor in Vernay site cleanup

    Vernay dug new monitoring wells around the perimeter of the its property in February, 2016, after the U.S. EPA requested the company start testing for vapors being released from an underground plume of toxic chemicals as part of a federal cleanup at the former rubber plant. (Submitted photo)

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is trying to determine whether vapors from an underground plume of toxic chemicals expose neighbors of a federal cleanup to dangerous levels of carcinogens, or if residents are safe from immediate and long-term harm.

  • Plans to expand mining in area cause concern

    A recent proposal by Enon Sand & Gravel to significantly expand mining operations in Mad River Township, just north of Yellow Springs, has many area residents deeply concerned.

  • Village utility changes beget odd bills

    The trepidation accompanying monthly bills has been on the increase over the past electric and water billing cycles, as a number of Yellow Springs residents have received significantly higher than usual utility bills.

  • Rumpke waste processing facility — Just don’t call it a garbage dump

    The Rumpke recycling facility outside of Cincinnati processes up to 55 tons of recyclables per day. The incoming materials are sorted by hand, then sorted further through a series of complicated mechanical processes. The Green Environmental Coalition recently organized a tour of the recycling center and landfill. (Photo by Dylan Taylor-Lehman)

    Trash is an inevitable part of life. A big part of life, to the tune of almost five pounds per person per day, and those five pounds of garbage have to go somewhere.