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Aug
20
2019
Yellow Springs
76°
broken clouds
humidity: 78%
wind: 7mph SSW
H 80 • L 76

Beyond Yellow Springs Section

  • Greene County— New jail, bigger jail?

    Does Greene County need a new jail? The consensus of county officials is yes. What are the key issues? And does the new facility need to be 30% larger than the existing jail? The third article in a series.

  • An afternoon fair’s fare

    The 4-H-sponsored rabbit costume contest — in which youngsters and their pet rabbits dress in tandem, themed costumes — was held on Wednesday night last week during the Greene County Fair. Above, 11-year-old Mackenna Spur, of Caesarscreek Township, and her rabbit, Pumpkin, were “on vacation.” (Photo by Lauren “Charles” Shows)

    At 8 a.m. on Sunday morning at the fairgrounds, there were no crowds, food booths were closed and the rides were dark and still. In the livestock buildings, however, the 180th Greene County Fair was in full swing.

  • John Crawford III memorial — Turnout, resolve at 5th anniversary

    John Crawford III is not forgotten. That was the main message Monday evening at a memorial along Pentagon Boulevard, outside the Walmart where Crawford, a 22-year-old black man, was shot and killed by a white Beavercreek police officer five years ago.  

  • Dayton ‘Media and Democracy’ event — Journalists oppose Cox Media sale

    A panel of journalists, politicians and educators aired their concerns about the proposed sale of Cox Media, which owns the Dayton Daily News and WHIO TV and radio, to a private equity firm, Apollo Global Management, during an event on the University of Dayton campus on Monday, July 29. Speaking is Tom Roberts, a former state legislator and past president of the Ohio Conference of the NAACP. To his right is Kevin Smith of Ohio University’s journalism school, former Dayton Daily News reporter Jim DeBrosse, UD political science professor Joel Pruce, veteran journalist Bob Daley, Dayton Mayor Nan Whaley (obscured), Yosef Getachew of Common Cause and Catherine Turcer of Common Cause Ohio. (Photo by Megan Bachman)

    Private equity firms now own more than one-third of major news outlets in the U.S. Working journalists have declined by half in a decade. And half of all Americans don’t get news from the community in which they live. 

  • Close the camps

    Villager Pat Dewees, left, lights the candle of retired Rev. Lynn Sinnott, of Cedarville, in Dayton at a vigil held in Dayton's Courthouse Square seeking the closure of immigrant detention camps in the U.S. (Photo by Carol Simmons)

    Yellow Springs was well represented Friday, July 12, as an estimated 300-some people from the Dayton area gathered in that city’s Courthouse Square as part of a nationwide vigil seeking the closure of immigrant detention camps in the U.S.

  • Steve Bognar receives a ‘Welcome to the Academy’

    Documentary filmmaker Steve Bognar was recently invited into the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences. Pictured here on the steps of the studio he shares with his filmmaking and life partner Julia Reichert, Bognar has been making documentary films, including this summer’s “American Factory,” for 35 years. (Photo by Audrey Hackett)

    The news came by email. Subject line: “Welcome to the Academy.” For a moment villager Steve Bognar was stumped. “The Academy? The Taekwondo Academy in Fairborn?” he joked in an interview at his Yellow Springs home this week.

  • The Longest Walk 2019— Spiritual journey makes stop

    Five Native American activists who are crossing the country in a five-month trek called “The Longest Walk: We Shall Continue” stopped Thursday, June 27, at Rockford Chapel on the Antioch College campus to share information about their journey and the 11 issues they carry. Pictured, from left, are walkers Michael Lane, Sharon Heta and Cynthia Young. (Photo by Carol Simmons)

    On the 137th day of a planned 155-day walk across the country, a small group of Native American activists stopped last week at Antioch College to talk about the issues that led them to spend five months on the road.

  • Symposium to address artificial intelligence

    On Monday, July 15, Antioch College will host an Artificial Intelligence Symposium from 4 to 6 p.m. at the Eichelberger Forum Main Stage at the Dayton Metro Library.

  • Artist’s work graces magazine cover

    The American Psychologist magazine recently featured the work of villager and artist David Battle, a triptych entitled “Trauma Reshaped,” on the cover of its May-June issue. (Courtesy of the artist)

    The American Psychologist magazine, published by the American Psychological Association, recently featured the work of villager and artist David Battle on the cover of its May-June issue.

  • No cages, no walls

    Dorothee Buron, of Yellow Springs, foreground, was one of about a half dozen villagers, along with about 60 others, who gathered near the office of Congressman Mike Turner (R-Dayton), on Tuesday, July 2, to protest the inhumane treatment of immigrants. (Photo by Megan Bachman)

    Around 60 protesters gathered near the office of Congressman Mike Turner (R-Dayton), on Tuesday, July 2, as part of a nationwide protest at 184 locations to demand action on the inhumane treatment of immigrants.