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Jan
20
2020
Yellow Springs
15°
light snow
humidity: 85%
wind: 8mph WNW
H 19 • L 17

Beyond Yellow Springs Section :: Page 5

  • Blue Jacket closes, café remains

    Xenia’s Blue Jacket Books will close for good May 12, with a progressive sale beginning March 5. But Blue Jacket’s popular in-store café, Tables of Contents, has no plans to close, according to owner Lawrence Hammar, pictured here with bookstore employee Yvonne Wingard. Bookstore and café are owned by Yellow Springers Hammar and his wife, Cassandra Lee, who operates the café. (Photo by Audrey Hackett)

    The eclectic independent purveyor of used and rare books in downtown Xenia, Blue Jacket Books, is closing — for reinvention.

  • Blue Jacket to close, but in-store cafe to stay

    Blue Jacket Books will close for good May 12. Meanwhile, a progressive sale begins March 5. And Blue Jacket's popular in-store cafe, Tables of Contents, will be staying open. Pictured here, owner Lawrence Hammar and worker Yvonne Wingard share a laugh, despite the sad reality of closure. (Photo by Audrey Hackett)

    Bibliophiles, take note: Blue Jacket Books is closing May 12. But foodies can take comfort in the fact that in-store cafe, Tables of Contents, has no plans to shut its doors, and may even expand in coming months.

  • Ohio EPA hears quarry concerns

    About 300 citizens packed the cafeteria of Greenon High School last Thursday to oppose a planned limestone quarrying project in Mad River Township, a few miles north of Yellow Springs. Ohio EPA organized the hearing, which was focused on one aspect of the project, a permit for wastewater discharge from the quarry. (Photo by Audrey Hackett)

    About 300 citizens packed the cafeteria of Greenon High School Feb. 1, voicing public opposition to a limestone quarrying plan a few miles north of Yellow Springs.

  • Grads on life beyond the ‘bubble’

    Meredith Rowe, a 2016 YSHS graduate, is enjoying big-city life at McGill University in Montreal. (Submitted photo)

    Yellow Springs is a wonderful place to grow up; the village is a sanctuary of safety and wholesomeness that offers its young residents a place to grow and develop, but most young villagers don’t stay in town forever.

  • County role serves public, courts

    Yellow Springs resident AJ Williams has been appointed Greene County Clerk of Courts after the retirement of longtime Clerk Terri Mazur. He will be sworn into office Feb. 2, and will represent the Greene County Republican Party in the May 8 primary. (Photo by Carol Simmons)

    The nameplate on the door of the Greene County Clerk of Courts office still listed longtime clerk Terri Mazur as the occupant mid-month, even though Yellow Springs resident AJ Williams had taken up residence at the first of the year.

  • Ohio EPA public hearing on quarry concerns set for Feb. 1

    “No Quarry” yard signs created by local citizens’ group, Citizens Against Mining, peppered yards along South Tecumseh Road near Greenon High School on a recent weekend. In July, the state of Ohio approved expanded limestone mining operations in Mad River Township, just north of Yellow Springs, intensifying oppposition from area residents. (Photo by Audrey Hackett)

    Area residents are invited to attend an Ohio EPA public hearing on water quality impacts of a planned mining expansion in Mad River Township, north of Yellow Springs. The hearing will be held Thursday, Feb. 1, at 6 p.m. at Greenon High School.

  • Man identified whose body was found in Clifton Gorge

    A man whose body was found Tuesday, Jan. 9 in Clifton Gorge was identified on Wednesday, Jan. 10, as Michael Fowler, age 65, of Springfield.

  • From VYS to the NYT

    Yellow Springs native Monica Drake, a New York Times journalist, was recently promoted to assistant managing editor, a position that appears on the venerable paper’s masthead. She will oversee new digital features and products for the paper. She traces her love of writing to her childhood in Yellow Springs. (Submitted photo)

    In early December, the New York Times elevated Yellow Springs native Monica Drake to its masthead as an assistant managing editor who will oversee the paper’s new digital features and projects.

  • Donations sought for Standing Rock

    The Wakpala Public School on the Standing Rock Reservation in South Dakota is one of two schools to request school supply donations, to be delivered next week by Yellow Springs resident Bettina Stolsenberg. (Submitted photo by Bettina Solas Stolsenberg)

    When Bettina Stolsenberg first traveled to the Standing Rock reservation in South Dakota two decades ago, she fell in love with the landscape and with the people. In a week, Stolsenberg plans to make that long drive again.

  • Pens to Pictures— Films give voice to prisoners

    Five short films created through the Pens to Pictures project, by five women incarcerated at Dayton Correctional Institution, will be screened Thursday, Nov. 2, 7 p.m., at Little Art Theatre. Pictured are the filmmakers and their program partners, including DCI assistant to the warden Vivian Covington, seated, front row left, and project originator and coordinator Chinoye Chukwu, seated, front row right. (Submitted photo by William Jones)

    Addiction, poverty, sexual abuse. The themes that run through the five short films created by incarcerated women through the Pens to Pictures project are difficult topics.