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Jan
28
2020
Yellow Springs
32°
mist
humidity: 81%
wind: 3mph WNW
H 37 • L 33

Higher Education Section

  • Antioch College Works— Increasing student aid, jobs

    For students with the highest need, Antioch College will soon be tuition-free.

  • The Decade in Review: Higher Education

    Antioch College President Mark Roosevelt addressed a capacity crowd on campus Tuesday afternoon with the news that he will be stepping down in December of this year, when his contract expires. He says he “will have finished” what he tried to do. (Photo by Matt Minde)

    Yellow Springs 2010–2019: Higher Education

  • 2019 Year in Review: Higher Education

    2019 Year in Review: Higher Education

  • Antioch College announces new full-tuition scholarships and work program

    Beginning in fall 2020, Antioch College will provide full-tuition scholarships to students eligible for Pell grants, as well as scholarships, job preparedness and post-baccalaureate job placement for all students.

  • A new vision for Antioch Hall

    If all goes as planned, Antioch Hall will have heat by the end of the year.
    The return of warmth to the iconic structure at Antioch’s heart, commonly known as Main Building, is the result of a unique collaboration between the college and village.

  • Clubs get students abuzz at Antioch

    Antioch has a centuries-long history of student-run endeavors, and with the first quarter of 2019 underway, more and more Independent Groups have begun popping up.

  • Lamb protesters deliver petition to Antioch College

    A group campaigning to save the nine lambs that are part of Antioch College’s farm-to-table program delivered a petition to President Tom Manley without incident this afternoon, Oct. 25.

  • Controversy over lambs intensifies

    The fate of nine lambs on the campus of Antioch College — the focus of an animal rights campaign since June — has generated fresh controversy and a threat this past week.

  • A look at Antioch Farm— ‘The fruits of our labor’

    On a June morning this year, local photographer James Luckett captured the chickens, geese and ducks on the Antioch farm. Luckett is now an assistant chef in the Antioch kitchens. (Submitted Photo by James Luckett)

    The concept of sustainability has been central to Antioch’s mission since its rebirth in 2011. And the farm remains at the heart of the school’s curriculum and identity.

  • WYSO now independent nonprofit

    Local public radio station 91.3 FM-WYSO, started by three Antioch College students in 1958, is now independent and community-owned. On Aug. 30, the Federal Communications Commission, or FCC, gave final approval for the transfer of the station’s broadcast license from longtime owner Antioch College to Miami Valley Public Media, Inc., a newly created nonprofit governed by a seven-member community board.