Nov
17
2019
Yellow Springs
32°
clear sky
humidity: 86%
wind: 7mph E
H 39 • L 36

Land & Environmental Section

  • Vernay cleanup plan— EPA listens to local concerns

    The EPA came to share the status of the environmental cleanup at Vernay Laboratories’ former rubber manufacturing plant on Dayton Street and to hear from citizens on the proposed remedy.

    The culmination of a two-decade long process, in June Vernay submitted its latest proposal to clean up contamination associated with its operations. The EPA is in the process of reviewing the plan and is interested in hearing from the public as it does, according to the site’s Technical Project Manager, Renee Wawczak, at the meeting.

  • Community Solutions conference— Hope in regenerative practices

    But messages of efficacy and hope, which can get lost in crisis turmoil, are at the heart of a three-day national conference Nov. 1–3 in Yellow Springs.
    “Pathways to Regeneration: Soil, Food, and Plant Medicine,” presented by the locally based Arthur Morgan Institute for Community Solutions, will offer alternative ways of thinking and acting.

  • Elli Sparks speaks at Glen Helen— Lobbying for climate solutions

    Sparks will be speaking in Yellow Springs on Thursday, Oct. 31, from noon to 2 p.m. at the Vernet Ecology Center at Glen Helen. The event is free and the subject of her discussion is how the Citizens’ Climate Lobby, or CCL, works to lobby elected officials to act on behalf of the environment, and to mitigate the effects of climate change.

  • EPA to address latest Vernay cleanup plan

    Two decades have passed since extensive contamination was discovered at the former rubber manufacturing facility. Under order from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Vernay has taken steps to stem the flow of contaminants in the groundwater under residential neighborhoods.

  • ‘Hometown Habitat’ film talks turning yards into wildlife habitats

    Director Catherine Zimmerman, pictured, and The Meadow Project produced "Hometown Heroes" to encourage audiences to make their communities habitable for pollinators like bees and butterflies. The film will screen at the Little Art on Dec. 3.

    Nationally acclaimed filmmaker Catherine Zimmerman will present her 90-minute documentary, “Hometown Habitat: Stories of Bringing Nature Home” on Friday, Oct. 25, 7–9 p.m. in the Vernet Ecological Center Auditorium.

  • Invasive of the month— Tree-of-heaven’s devilish dispersal

    Brought to this country in the 1700s as a horticultural specimen and shade tree, tree-of-heaven is one of North America’s most invasive tree species.

  • Awe, wonder of monarch butterflies

    Monarchs — beloved locally and beyond — are dying off in enormous numbers.

  • Invasive of the month— Japanese stiltgrass moves in

    Japanese stiltgrass is on the move in Yellow Springs, creeping into yards and forested areas. Here’s how to identify, and root out, this non-native invasive grass.

  • Scenes from the Greene County Fair — Rabbit costume contest

    Last Wednesday during the Greene County Fair was the 4-H-sponsored rabbit costume contest — in which youngsters and their pet rabbits dress in tandem, themed costumes.

  • Invasive of the month— climbing vines

    Two invasives: Wintercreeper/euonymus, left, and Asian bittersweet, right, are two non-native invasive climbing vines widespread in Yellow Springs. (Photos by Audrey Hackett)

    If you see something green in winter, it’s probably wintercreeper, a non-native invasive species of euonymus. Asian bittersweet is a little harder to identify. It’s most noticeable in the fall, when its leaves are off and bright red berries and yellow seed capsules make the plant attractive to some.