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Oct
27
2020

Articles About Dayton Correctional Institution

  • Bringing mindfulness to prison

    Katie Egart of the Yellow Springs Dharma Center is shown here, top center, with a Marysville prison inmate who presented her, along with Dharma Center members Donna Denman and MJ Gentile, with an original painting of the center in appreciation for the meditation group that Egart leads there. Egart, a Buddhist priest, travels to Marysville and to the Dayton Correctional Institute two times a month to hold a meditation session for interested inmates. (Submitted photo)

    Whenever Katie Egart walks into the Dayton Correctional Institution, or DCI, she encounters locked doors.

  • Pens to Pictures— Films give voice to prisoners

    Five short films created through the Pens to Pictures project, by five women incarcerated at Dayton Correctional Institution, will be screened Thursday, Nov. 2, 7 p.m., at Little Art Theatre. Pictured are the filmmakers and their program partners, including DCI assistant to the warden Vivian Covington, seated, front row left, and project originator and coordinator Chinoye Chukwu, seated, front row right. (Submitted photo by William Jones)

    Addiction, poverty, sexual abuse. The themes that run through the five short films created by incarcerated women through the Pens to Pictures project are difficult topics.

  • Play tells inmates’ stories

    This week Craig Powell, left, executive director of the Dayton nonprofit PowerNet, met with local playwright and director Tony Dallas to discuss Dallas’ current project, a play based on stories from female inmates in the Dayton Correctional Institution. PowerNet, which aims to help former prisoners transition back into communities, is sponsoring the project, which is funded by the Ohio Arts Council. (Photo by Diane Chiddister)

    “Theater needs to be about the large things,” Tony Dallas said in a recent interview. “I want that kind of theater.”