Oct
15
2019
Yellow Springs
72°
clear sky
humidity: 43%
wind: 11mph SW
H 62 • L 59

Articles About Growing Local

  • A look at Antioch Farm— ‘The fruits of our labor’

    On a June morning this year, local photographer James Luckett captured the chickens, geese and ducks on the Antioch farm. Luckett is now an assistant chef in the Antioch kitchens. (Submitted Photo by James Luckett)

    The concept of sustainability has been central to Antioch’s mission since its rebirth in 2011. And the farm remains at the heart of the school’s curriculum and identity.

  • Lending local farmers a hand

    Yellow Springs Farmers Market coordinator Michele Burns sold maple syrup at her stall at the weekly market earlier this season. More recently, her Flying Mouse Farms booth has also featured greens, beets, broccoli and cauliflower. Burns sees the farmers market as a key part of the local food system. (Photo by Luciana Lieff)

    Over the last few weeks, the News interviewed farmers who raise livestock and grow produce for the local market. They spoke to the joys and challenges of farming, both brought into sharper detail with this season’s stormy weather. This week, the News covers what local organizations are doing to grow the local food movement.

  • Heartbeat Learning Gardens — Eat local, heal local

    While harvest day at Heartbeat Learning Gardens always has an air of celebration, last week’s was “bittersweet,” in the words of longtime volunteer MJ Gentile.

  • A new farm is hit with tragedy

    Kimball and Stephanie Osborne, with their children, Elli, left, and Alina, in the lush greenhouse at Oasis Aqua Farms in Beavercreek Township last month, before the tornado hit their property. (Photo by Megan Bachman)

    Last month, a whiteboard in the heated greenhouse at Oasis Aqua Farms in Beavercreek Township boasted a variety of fresh, organically grown greens and herbs available that day. Then came the tornado.

  • Growing local—Coming home to their cows

    Scott and Jillian Marshall are in their seventh year of raising beef cattle at their West Jackson Road farm a few miles northeast of the village. The local farmers — who still have their day jobs — love caring for the cows, teaching their children about the cycle of life and serving customers with antibiotic-free, mostly grass-fed beef. (Photo by Megan Bachman)

    Although agriculture is Ohio’s No. 1 industry, most of what is grown in the state is not consumed here.