Jul
05
2020

Articles About senior citizens

  • COVID-19 update— Nursing homes vulnerable

    Nursing homes across Ohio have adopted similar measures, and all have been operating under visitor restrictions since ordered to do so by the state health department on March 13.

  • Advance care planning resources

    The YSSC and the YSCF have compiled a list of resources and organizations that facilitate advance care and end of life planning.

  • Village Council— Senior apartments change OK’d

    A redesigned 54-unit senior apartment building was given the green light by Village Council at its Dec. 2 regular meeting.

  • Fitness class keeps seniors moving

    Jane Blakelock, center, stretched during a Sit Strong senior fitness class at the John Bryan Community Center this week. From the stage, fitness instructor Lynn Hardman called out and modeled the next move. Hardman, who is passionate about senior wellness, is starting a new workshop in the village focused on balance. (Photo by Megan Bachman)

    Two years ago, Jane Blakelock struggled to navigate subway stairs and keep up on long walks on a visit to her daughter in New York City. But multiple classes each week of Lynn Hardman’s Sit Strong changed everything.

  • ‘Conscious aging’ event

    Cleveland resident Mary Grigolia, minister of the Unitarian Fellowship in Oberlin, will present a workshop on “Conscious Aging” on Saturday, Nov. 4, at 9:30 a.m., at the Senior Center. All are invited. (Submitted photo)

    In American culture, youth is elevated and elders are often dismissed. But organizers of this week’s workshop on “Conscious Aging” want to change that trend.

  • Carl Hyde: A habit of caring, and aging well

    Carl Hyde, who moved into the Friends Assisted Living Center a year ago, first came to Yellow Springs as an Antioch College freshman more than 70 years ago. After more than four decades as a town physician, he’s known to many as “Dr. Hyde.” He rides his bike regularly in good weather. (Photo by Diane Chiddister)

    Though he retired more than 15 years ago, Carl Hyde’s habit of caring for people remains.