Wagner Subaru
Aug
14
2020

Arts Section :: Page 98

  • Red carpet for film biz partners

    There are many differences in the lives of good friends Diana Scott and Donna Lynn Johnson. A practicing nurse as well as the owner of Scott Street Tavern in Springfield, Scott is also a film student at Wright State University and the mother of two children. Johnson has a teenage son and is the owner of the Main Squeeze on Xenia Avenue. In her spare time, she runs a food consulting company and previously held positions with companies like Dole and Safeway Manufacturing in her native California.

    There is, however, something that is bringing these two seemingly divergent lives together: a joint venture that they have named Mad River Films.

  • A nonprofit, Little Art lives on

    Zack McGhee loves the Little Art Theatre. He first started coming here for the indie circuit as a teenager from Fairborn and then in 2006 became a projectionist to get paid for one of his favorite pastimes. He is proud to have brought his Republican parents here to see films such as Michael Moore’s Bowling […]

  • Skeins away! Yarn-bombers strike

    Forgive this reporter for stating the obvious: Yellow Springs has been yarn bombed.

    Yarn Bombing, a new glossy craft book, has a definite Yellow Springs flavor: the book features full-page spreads of the fiber art of locals Nancy Mellon and Corrine Bayraktaroglu — aka the JafaGirls — presented as a radical art practice called knit graffiti.

  • Filmmakers strike a nerve with D.C. ‘Tea Party’ march video

    “We knew when we were putting it up that if it had a certain quality and speed, it might get attention,” Whiteside said.

  • ‘Last Truck’ focuses on GM family

    The job of an automobile assembly line worker is to assemble one particular part over and over and over again on each vehicle that comes down the line, GM employee Kim Clay explains in the film. On the day the Moraine plant closed in December 2008, when the last truck came down the line, workers no longer had a job to do, he says — they no longer had a purpose. He felt it, others felt it. And Louis Carter, who applied the sticker with the last serial number on it, especially felt it.

  • ‘Red Pants’ dance

    Copies of this and other photographs may be purchased from the News; please contact us via e-mail at ysnews@ysnews.com, or by phone, between 9:30 a.m. and 5: 30 p.m., Mon.–Fri.

  • Skaters, music at park fundraiser

    Festival line-up The 3rd annual Skate and Music Fest will take place on Friday, Aug. 21, from 5 to 10 p.m., at the Yellow Springs Skate Park in conjunction with the Third Friday Fling. There will be music and skating to benefit the YS Skate Park. A $5 to $10 donation is requested to help […]

  • Dancing near the streets

    Copies of this and other photographs may be purchased from the News; please contact us via e-mail at ysnews@ysnews.com, or by phone, between 9:30 a.m. and 5: 30 p.m., Mon.–Fri.

  • Recession knocks local nonprofits

    Almost a full year after the national economic seizure, nonprofit organizations in the village are feeling the squeeze in their budgets. The crash affected most markedly the heftily endowed, and it hurt most cruelly the service-oriented groups. While contraction to reduce expenditures is an option, many local nonprofits are choosing to maintain or expand their programs in hopes of riding out a temporary financial slump.

  • Flexibility is key for new arts center

    For theater professionals, the most important attribute of a new arts center facility would be flexibility, meaning that a ground floor performance space that could seat up to 300 could transform into an intimate, experimental stage with seating for 30.