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Aug
15
2022

Village Life Section :: Page 30

  • Youth take lead in challenging racism

    For many local teens and young adults in their early 20s, the accumulating deaths feel personal. Young people of color see themselves and their families being treated differently, and they feel under threat within the national culture; while their young white allies see disparities in privilege and safety that negatively affect the lives of their Black peers.

  • COVID–19 update— After Ohio restart, virus is spreading again

    The trend holds true for Greene County, which saw its per capita case rate more than double over the last month, even as the county remains relatively better off than the rest of the state and country. As of July 6, there were 99 active COVID-19 cases in Greene County, up from 58 on June 18.

  • Parade canceled after alleged KKK protest threat

    Nerak Roth Patterson parades his red convertible through downtown at 2018's Fourth of July parade (Photo by Diane Chiddister)

    All the organizers interviewed this week also said the decision was influenced by the voicemail from a man purporting to be affiliated with the KKK, a notorious hate group with a long history of violence against Black people.

  • Racism in village often covert

    The YS Community Foundation Encore Miller Fellows helped support the Courageous Conservations series, organized by The 365 Project and the Yellow Springs Havurah to address issues of race. Here, one local group met earlier this year. From left is David Seitz, Vivian Markley, Kirk Weigand, Megan Bachman, Mori Rothman, Karen McKee, Moya Shea, Marianne MacQueen, Lauren Heaton (obscured), and Locksley Orr. Also participating in the group was Rich Bullock and Encore Miller Fellow Jalyn Roe, who co-facilitated with MacQueen. A new round of Courageous Conversations is starting up in the fall. Those interested in participating should contact Encore Miller Fellow Len Kramer at len2654@gmail.com, or 937-572-4840. (Submitted photo)

    Facing Race: This is first in a series on the impacts of racism in Yellow Springs and local anti-racist efforts and activities.

  • Solidarity on Stonewall anniversary

    What happened at Stonewall in NYC 1969, was a riot against the police. It wasn’t in answer to just a few homophobic police officers targeting our social havens in one city. This was a manifestation of our rage against the socially, politically, legally sanctioned nationwide assault on our culture.

  • Creating wildlife habitat, villagewide

    In late summer, native sunflowers in Ellen Hoover’s garden draw goldfinches. The bright yellow birds feast on seeds, then burst out like sunflower petals flung to the sky. Down the street, monarch butterflies browse Catherine Zimmerman’s coneflowers, goldenrod and asters.

  • COVID-19 update— ‘Worrisome’ trend? More new cases

    New cases of COVID-19 are rising in Greene County, Gov. Mike DeWine said at his June 18 press briefing. He highlighted Greene County as one of five southwest Ohio counties that have seen case increases in June.

  • Celebrate Pride 2020 in Yellow Springs

    The Yellow Springs Pride Committee will kick off the annual Pride celebrations with a car parade on Saturday, June 27, followed by live streamed speakers, music and the announcement of the winners of the “Most Prideful Yard” contest.

  • Glen Helen capital campaign— GHA seeks to raise $3.5M

    Rebecca Jaramilla, director of the Raptor Center at Glen Helen Nature Preserve, handled Velocity, a female peregrine falcon, during a raptor photography program at the center on Sunday, Feb. 24. (Photo by Luciana Lieff)

    Glen Helen isn’t open — yet. But the Glen’s new future owner is moving rapidly to raise funds, restore staff and work to reopen the 1,000-acre local nature preserve, which has been closed to the public since late March due to COVID-19.

  • ‘Worrisome’ COVID-19 rise in Greene County and SW Ohio

    Greene County is one of five southwest Ohio counties in which COVID-19 cases are rising, even as cases overall are falling in Ohio. Gov. Mike DeWine called the trend “worrisome” at his June 18 press briefing.

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