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Mar
31
2020

Articles About First Lines

  • First Lines — ‘And the heart calls me …’

    Who am I, really? A contemplative poem by villager Khara Scott-Bey explores self-definition to the edges of identity, and beyond.

  • First Lines — JOY JOY JOY

    A poem from a former villager, the late Jean Barlow Hudson. Strange, dreamlike, filled with somberness and joy, Jean’s poem helps us welcome the turning of the year.

  • First Lines — Poetry of the sleeping breath

    Eternity sleeps. (Photo by Matt Minde)

    The voice of the dog. Simple, straightforward. And then, like a child who speaks an uncanny truth, soulful. Two “poems for dogs” from villager Artie Isaac.

  • First Lines — October, catching fire

    Not all poems marvel or praise. Some embrace the bleakness — as this month’s poem by MJ White does, beautifully.

  • First Lines — A wisdom poem

    “There is an impassable gap ….” A poem from villager Jim Malarkey contemplates our strangeness to each other. Intimacy as well as violence grows in that “gap.”

  • First Lines — ‘While tottering …’

    In this month’s poem, villager Janeal Turnbull Ravndal meditates on marriage, aging and the loss of balance, leading to new forms of grace.

  • First Lines — The world of objects

    What do objects want? This month’s poem by Reilly Dixon enters the world of objects.

  • First Lines — Of memory, hiding and identity

    What happens to those who came before us also happens to us. In a poem by villager Maxine Skuba, world history and personal history touch hands.

  • First Lines — The magic of small forms

    This month’s poems come from longtime villager Rubin Battino, who has been writing three-line poems for decades. “We hit it off,” he said of the short form, his own adaptation of haiku.

  • First Lines — The hide and seek of happiness

    “There’s just no accounting for happiness,” begins a poem I love by Jane Kenyon. Happiness in this poem is a gift, a grace, as it seems to be in this month’s poem from musician Carl Schumacher.