Subscribe Anywhere
Wagner Subaru
May
27
2020

Articles About First Lines :: Page 2

  • First Lines — Of memory, hiding and identity

    What happens to those who came before us also happens to us. In a poem by villager Maxine Skuba, world history and personal history touch hands.

  • First Lines — The magic of small forms

    This month’s poems come from longtime villager Rubin Battino, who has been writing three-line poems for decades. “We hit it off,” he said of the short form, his own adaptation of haiku.

  • First Lines — The hide and seek of happiness

    “There’s just no accounting for happiness,” begins a poem I love by Jane Kenyon. Happiness in this poem is a gift, a grace, as it seems to be in this month’s poem from musician Carl Schumacher.

  • First Lines — The season of firsts

    Spring. We become aware of it not just by the calendar, but more viscerally by signs. By firsts, as in this poem by local writer and teacher Ed Davis.

  • First Lines — The freedom of poems

    There is enormous freedom in a poem. It is the same freedom found within the human mind. This month, a poem, or a spacious poem-prayer, by villager Moriel Rothman-Zecher.

  • First Lines — In memoriam: Mary Oliver

    Mary Oliver is the lovely, lambent consciousness of every poem she wrote in praise of heron and hawk, windflower and black oak, lightning and first snow. It is she who went out into the world, she who scribbled notes.

  • First Lines — Two friends, two poems

    For friends and poets Anne Randolph and Mary Donahoe, poetry was a natural part of the women’s bond. This month’s column presents a poem by each: “Mary’s Garden,” by Randolph, and “Carolina Wren,” by Donahoe.

  • First Lines — New moves: a poetry column

    The News is launching a monthly poetry column, “First Lines.” Each month, we’ll publish a poem written by a local poet.