Nov
21
2018
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economy Section

Yellow Springs lost an additional 7.3 percent of its population in the last decade, continuing a 40-year population plummet.

More economy Articles
  • Environmental news — EPA responds to Vernay cleanup plan

    YSI Senior Scientist Jessica Moyer displayed the flag the company received for an Ohio EPA Encouraging Environmental Excellence award at its Brannum Lane facility. YSI received the highest level — platnium —for its work to conserve resources at their facility and in the wider community. YSI, now owned by Xylem, is a 70-year-old local company that designs and manufacturers water sampling and monitoring instruments used around the globe and in the region, including by the Ohio EPA. (Photo by Megan Bachman)

    It’s been 16 years since Vernay Laboratories began working under order of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to develop a plan to clean up contamination at and around the company’s former manufacturing facility at 875 Dayton St. But Vernay has more work to do before its final cleanup plan is approved.

  • Cresco Labs opens its doors

    Cultivation agent Jerico Castillo pruned cannabis plants this week in an indoor greenhouse at Cresco’s medical marijuana facility in Yellow Springs. Visit ysnews.com for more photos from the Cresco tour. (Photo by Megan Bachman)

    On Monday, Oct. 8, Cresco Labs of Yellow Springs opened its doors to local media and public officials for a ribbon-cutting ceremony and facility tour of the medical marijuana grower.

  • An inside look at Cresco Labs

    Yesterday Cresco Labs of Yellow Springs opened its doors to a small group of local media and public officials for a ribbon-cutting ceremony and facility tour of the medical marijuana grower.

  • Village Council — Home, Inc. requests funds

    Local affordable housing developer Home, Inc. can help the Village meet its housing goals, according to a funding pitch made by Home, Inc.’s board and staff at Village Council’s Sept. 17 meeting. 

  • New family doctor joins practice

    Last month, Dr. Jessica Gallagher, M.D., joined Dr. Donald Gronbeck at Yellow Springs Primary Care, where she specializes in family medicine. Yellow Springs Primary Care is an independent primary care provider that opened in May 2014. (Photo by Anne Day)

    In the effort to serve more patients from in and around the village, a local medical office has added a new doctor.

  • Incubator sparks food interest

    Chef Amber Tipton of The Neighborhood Nest rolled out dough recently at the SPARK Gluten-Free kitchen incubator in Fairborn. Several local businesses are anchored at the incubator, which is informing local discussions to create one here. (Photo by Lauren “ChucK” Shows)

    If you look at it the right way, a new business is like a seed: it needs a good, fertile place to grow.

  • YS Credit Union celebrates 70 years

    The Yellow Springs Federal Credit Union is marking its 70th anniversary with a public celebration on Saturday, Sept. 29, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., at its downtown offices. Pictured are YSCU President and CEO Sandy Hollenberg, left, and employees Peter Mayne and Angel Johnston. (Photo by Carol Simmons)

    What began as a small cooperative financial initiative is now a 70-year-old local institution.

  • Cresco Labs planting, moving ahead

    Cresco Labs’ 50,000-square-foot facility on the western edge of Yellow Springs was recently granted a certificate of operation from the state. The company is now growing cannabis for the medical marijuana market. (Photo by Megan Bachman)

    Last Friday, Sept. 14, Cresco Labs in Yellow Springs was granted its certificate of operation by the State of Ohio, allowing the company to begin its production of medical marijuana.

  • Cresco Labs cleared to grow cannabis in Yellow Springs

    Cresco Labs announced on Friday, Sept. 14, that its Yellow Springs marijuana cultivation facility had received a certificate of operation from the state.

  • Company turns trash into treasure

    Matthew Lawson sees a treasure trove of biodiversity in rotting organic waste. His company, Trillium Organic Services, will soon offer curbside composting in the Village. (Submitted Photo )

    Matthew Lawson is passionate about compost. Where some see stinky, rotting waste, Lawson sees a renewable resource. What is worthless trash to some is, to him, a rich biodiversity.