Jul
29
2017
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An outdoor yoga session will be offered at Antioch College.

An outdoor yoga session will be offered at Antioch College.

Free yoga class offered

A free, all-levels yoga class will be offered outdoors at Antioch College on Saturday, Aug. 5., 9–10 a.m.

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Arts (archives)

Village Schools (archives)

Economy (archives)

  •   Wander & Wonder into new store

    Jake Brummett, shown above, and his wife, Raina, recently opened Wander & Wonder, a store featuring outdoor lifestyle gear in the space formerly occupied by OATS and, before that, Urban Handmade. The couple sell products, including pet gear and hammocks, from environmentally responsible companies. (Photo by Suzanne Szempruch)Jake and Raina Brummett, owners of the newly opened outdoor lifestyle store Wander & Wonder, are no strangers to the trails and hiking spots throughout Yellow Springs.

  •   Only fresh and local for taco truck

    Miguel’s Tacos, the village’s newest food truck, serves up tacos and bowls made with fresh ingredients behind the Trail Tavern Thursdays through Sundays, 11:30 a.m. to 7 p.m. Shown above are the truck’s owner, Miguel Espinosa, at left, and David Boyer. (Submitted Photo )Locals may have noticed a new addition to the growing population of food trucks in the village. Miguel’s Tacos, located behind Asanda Imports in King’s yard, has quickly become a popular destination for authentic Mexican tacos.

  •   Jobs, business first choice for CBE land

    Most villagers who weighed in on the topic would like to see the land known as the Center for Business and Education, or CBE, used in a way that promotes local economic development.

Village Life (archives)

  •   Yucky balls and divine mud

    It’s been an unusually wet month. WHIOTV7 weather says we’ve had 4.04 inches of rain this month and that the normal amount of rain in July is 2.91 inches. "This isn’t T-ball,” Erin Fink exclaimed. “It’s mud ball!"

  •   Major League Baseball: Dodgers win season

    The 2017 Minor League post-season tournament lingers on, thanks to more rain last weekend that delayed the championship game not just once, but twice.

  •   Harold Wright— A bridger of words, and worlds

    Poet, poetry translator and retired Antioch College professor of Japanese language and literature, Harold Wright has lived in Yellow Springs since 1973. He’s made many dozens of trips to Japan over the years. Here, he’s pictured with his wife, Jonatha, on the porch of their North Winter Street home. (Photo by Audrey Hackett)It’s been a dozen years since Harold Wright’s last trip to Japan, the longest time he’s been away from the country he fell in love with as a young man. But this fall, he and his wife, Jonatha, will be flying to Tokyo as the honored guests of Emperor Meiji.

Government (archives)

Obituaries (archives)

  •   Stephen M. Alexander

    Stephen M. AlexanderStephen M. Alexander, of Canton, Mass., passed away July 19 at the Tufts Medical Center in Boston. He was 52.

  •   Mary McDonald Memorial

    A memorial for Mary McDonald will be held on Saturday, Aug. 5, 2 p.m., at Glen Helen’s Vernet Building.

  •   Mary McDonald Memorial

    A memorial for Mary McDonald will be held on Saturday, Aug. 5, 2 p.m., at Glen Helen’s Vernet Building.

Higher Education (archives)

Sports (archives)

  •   Yucky balls and divine mud

    It’s been an unusually wet month. WHIOTV7 weather says we’ve had 4.04 inches of rain this month and that the normal amount of rain in July is 2.91 inches. "This isn’t T-ball,” Erin Fink exclaimed. “It’s mud ball!"

  •   Major League Baseball: Dodgers win season

    The 2017 Minor League post-season tournament lingers on, thanks to more rain last weekend that delayed the championship game not just once, but twice.

  •   A muddlicious time at T-ball

    I love the mud balls and mud puddles. In fact, I yearn for the days before the Village put in drainage pipes, which drain the field after a good rain, forever eliminating the great six-foot-diameter, 28 square feet of water puddles of yesteryear.