From The Print Section :: Page 119

  • Council okays search process

    At their Feb. 6 meeting, Village Council members agreed to hire Don Vermillion of the University of Dayton as consultant for the Village manager search process.

  • New family doctor comes to town

    Dr. Alan Fark has set up his new family medicine practice at 716 Xenia Avenue. His office is under the umbrella of the Springfield Regional Medical Group. (Photo by Diane Chiddister)

    The local arts scene — and specifically this week’s Chamber Music Yellow Springs concert — can take some credit for bringing Dr. Alan Fark, a new physician, to town.

  • Chamber Music Yellow Springs to fund new music

    Yellow Springs native Allen McCullough was commissioned to write a piece for string quartet by CMYS, in support of new music by young artists. (Submitted photo)

    Chamber Music Yellow Springs recently extended a rare invitation for a new work by an artist whose exposure to music growing up in the village delivered him to the life of a composer.

  • Trumbull nets college scholarship

    Senior Jacob Trumbull will play soccer next year at Centre College, a Division III school in Danville, Ky. In his final season as a Bulldog, Trumbull scored 35 goals, the ninth highest in Ohio. (Photo by Megan Bachman)

    Yellow Springs High School senior Jacob Trumbull committed last week to play soccer next year at Centre College in Danville, Ky., the culmination of more than a decade playing for local recreational, club and school teams.

  • Blind pigs, turkeys, goats find home

    Nick Ormes cares for abandoned and neglected animals at the Ranch Menagerie Animal Sactuary on Village-owned property on US 68. He’s hoping to raise more money to feed his 73 animals through the winter and to raise awarness about the epidemic of stray, abandoned, neglected and abused animals. (Photo by Megan Bachman)

    Nick Ormes can rattle off from memory the animals he looks after on his 12-acre animal sanctuary on US 68. Abandoned or neglected by their owners, these animals faced a life of suffering or the slaughterhouse until Ormes, 58, stepped in to save them.

  • 90 years child-centered learning

    Comedian Julia Sweeney, center, will perform at the Antioch School’s 90th anniversary auction gala next month. Sweeney, a cast member on Saturday Night Live in the 1990s, was persuaded to come by Kipra Heerman, left, and Liz Griffin, right, of the Antioch School development committee, who drove to Chicago to tell her about one of the nation’s older alternative schools last fall. (Submitted photo)

    To keep the Antioch School, one of America’s oldest independent schools alive, its board and development committee will put on an anniversary auction gala next month commemorating the Antioch School’s 90th school year to raise $25,000 for tuition scholarships and operating expenses.

  • Antioch College’s ‘Happy crisis’ continues

    The recent “happy crisis” of Antioch College going viral on the Internet with its offer of a tuition-free education took center stage at the college’s Board of Trustees meeting last weekend, with leaders discussing how to respond to the unexpected national and international attention.

  • YS Arts Council finds new home

    Village Arts Council is moving from Oten Gallery to a new gallery and performance space at 111 Corry Street, the building formerly occupied by Dolbeer’s Cleaners and the Rolling Pen Book Cafe. Arts Council board and staff members pictured are, from left, Corrine Bayraktaroglu, Deb Housh, Jerome Borchers, Nick Gaskins, Kathy Reed, Anita Brown, Joanne Caputo and Nancy Mellon. (Photo by Lauren Heaton)

    When the Yellow Springs Arts Council moved to its new gallery space on Corry Street last month, the group was following the mission prescribed by the community: grow in capacity and keep art and public art events vibrant in Yellow Springs.

  • Village a good host for babies

    The Yellow Springs Library hosts a toddler story hour every Thursday from 2–3 p.m., one of the many ways in which the village supports gatherings for families and their young children. Last week Paige Clark and Alex Finney, foreground, hung out with Ann Fay and her son David, Laura Funderburg and her son Carson, and Carrie Finney and her infant son Tommy. (Photo by Lauren Heaton)

    When Laura Funderburg had her son, Carson, now almost 2, she knew the village was a better fit for the way she wanted to raise her son. And the warm community of parents and children she has found in the village erased all doubt in her mind that she made the right decision.

  • Feminist film gets national honor

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    As Antioch College students in the late 1960s, Julia Reichert and Jim Klein made a feature film about the experience of being female that both rode the modern wave of the feminist movement.

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