village-life Section

Yellow Springs lost an additional 7.3 percent of its population in the last decade, continuing a 40-year population plummet.

More village-life Articles
  • Food pantry seeks holiday donations

    Food Pantry director Patty McAllister, left, will this month hand over the job to Paula Hurwitz, center. Ruth Paige, right, will coordinate volunteers for the effort. Donations are welcome during the holiday season, and all year long.

    Demand at the Yellow Springs Food Pantry always goes up during the holidays, and donations are welcome.

  • Ash trees felled in John Bryan State Park

    The emerald ash borer, an invasive species native to Asia, was discovered in North America in 2002, and has been infecting Ohio trees since as early as 2003. (Photo: http://www.agri.ohio.gov/eab)

    The Ohio Department of Natural Resources, or ODNR, began removal of a number of ash trees impacted by the invasive emerald ash borer, or EAB, from John Bryan State Park yesterday, Dec. 8.

  • A day of disability awareness at AUM

    Yellow Springs resident Debra Williamson, here with her son Alex Oliver, is organizing a conference on the issues facing those with mental and physical disabilities. “Valuing Diversity: A Day of Disability Awareness and Education” is Friday, Dec. 5, at Antioch University Midwest. (Submitted photo)

    Antioch University Midwest will host an all-day conference on disability on Friday, Dec. 5, aimed at raising awareness about the issues facing those with physical and mental disabilities.

  • Community Thanksgiving today

    Former villager Eva Paige was one of several hundred who enjoyed the 2013 Community Thanksgiving Dinner. The annual events takes place today at 2 p.m. at the First Presbyterian Church.

    The annual Community Thanksgiving Dinner takes place today at 2 p.m. at the First Presbyterian Church.

  • Scientist finds new ash borer host

    Wright State University Biology Professor Dr. Don Cipollini pointed out his groundbreaking discovery that the white fringe tree can be a host for the emerald ash borer. Cipollini was the first to publish research and convince the U.S. EPA to confirm the white fringe tree as the only other known host for the invasive beetle. Trees planted along the bike path and elsewhere in the village were instrumental to his discovery. (Photo by Megan Bachman)

    A local white fringe tree planted along the bike path is now famous as the second documented host of an invasive beetle that was thought to only prey upon ash trees.

  • Holiday in the Village, Yellow Springs 2014

    Tiny 2014-15 Guide to Yellow Springs

    Read the online edition of the annual Holiday in the Village guide.

  • Rise against the green Glen invaders

    Glen volunteer Vincent Laino helped to clear invasive honeysuckle from the Glen over the summer.

    If weeding the flower garden out back sounds bad, imagine weeding a forest. Then imagine that forest encircled by an army of invasive species.

  • Glen Helen welcomes volunteers to Honeysuckle Daze

    Glen volunteer Vincent Laino helped to clear invasive honeysuckle from the Glen over the summer.

    Among its various efforts to remove invasive species this year, the Glen invites volunteers to join its annual Honeysuckle Daze on Saturday, Nov. 15.

  • Warm up with bonfires on Beggars Night

    jackolanterns

    This year’s Beggars Night will be held Halloween night, Friday, Oct. 31, 6–8 p.m., with bonfires throughout the village.

  • Popular scientist Michio Kaku talks about possibilities of the future

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    Michio Kaku will give the Fred R. Leventhal Endowed Lecture at Wittenberg Thursday on how Science will revolutionize the future.