Subscribe Anywhere
May
19
2022

Articles by Carol Simmons :: Page 42

  • Beloved Mr. Fub’s Party to close

    Word that Mr. Fub’s Party toy store is closing with the retirement of owner Priscilla Moore, left, brought longtime patron and former villager Donna McGovern into the shop with her granddaughter, Kennedy, this past weekend to wish Moore well. (Photo by Carol Simmons)

    The party’s over. Priscilla Moore, owner and proprietor of Mr. Fub’s Party toy store, has decided to call it a day after 37 years in business.

  • ‘Fefu’ fun and thought-provoking

    Amy Taint and Sommer McGuire rehearse a scene from the play “Fefu and Her Friends." (Photo by Carol Simmons)

    “Fefu and Her Friends” production opens this weekend at First Presbyterian Church with performances at 8 p.m. Thursdays through Saturdays, Sept. 28–30 and Oct. 5–7. Tickets are $10 at the door.

  • Four villagers running for school board, two for re-election

    Four candidates — two incumbents and two challengers — are running for three open seats on the Yellow Springs Board of Education in the Nov. 7 election. 

  • Comfort, self-care at Blue Butterfly

    Brian and Eileen Petri of Springboro and their daughters Bridget and Allie recently opened The Blue Butterfly, a store offering home décor and items of personal comfort, at the former location of Urban Gypsy on Dayton Street. (Photo by Carol Simmons)

    Written in chalk on a small blackboard outside the recently opened Blue Butterfly boutique on Dayton Street, the message captures the new shop’s thematic focus on home décor and personal items that offer self-care or emotional comfort.

  • Board of Education— Meeting focuses on facilities

    The Yellow Springs Board of Education met in a work session on Wednesday, Sept. 13, to take stock of the ongoing discussion about the future of the district’s physical facilities and to determine the board’s next steps.

  • Activists are awake and watching

    Yellow Springs resident Susan Alberter (left front), the driving force behind Greene County Indivisible: Awake and Watching, was among a number of group members who participated in a rally Tuesday, Sept. 5, in downtown Dayton to protest the president’s efforts to rescind President Barack Obama’s executive order known as DACA, or Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals. An estimated 100 people, many from Yellow Springs, gathered outside U.S. Rep. Mike Turner’s regional office to urge Turner to help retain the legal status of 800,000 young people called “Dreamers.” (Photo by Carol Simmons)

    They’ve been dressing up in chicken suits each Monday and visiting downtown Dayton with signs suggesting that U.S. Representative Mike Turner, whose regional office is there, might be “a chicken” for not meeting yet this year with local constituents in a town hall setting.

  • Celebrating 30 years of community mediation

    The Village Mediation Program is marking its 30th anniversary this month. Village Council passed a resolution Tuesday, Sept. 5, honoring the group’s three decades of service, and a public celebration will be held Thursday, Sept. 14, 7 p.m., at Antioch University Midwest. Pictured are some of the current team of village mediators. Clockwise from top left, are founding mediator Bruce Heckman, mediator Jalyn Roe, current program coordinator John Gudgel and mediator Janet Mueller. (Photo by Carol Simmons)

    There’s really no knowing the extent to which Yellow Springs might be different if not for the existence of the Village Mediation Program.

  • Village schools— New year, new requirements

    With the new school year also comes a variety of new initiatives and policies — some the result of changing state and federal requirements and funding.

  • First of many

    Layla Walland, 5, was ready for her first day of kindergarten. Her father, Matt Walland, and 2-year-old brother, Finn, looked on. (Photo by Carol Simmons)

    Layla Walland, 5, was ready for her first day of kindergarten to begin in Linnea Denman’s class at Mills Lawn on Friday, Aug. 25, while her father, Matt Walland, and 2-year-old brother, Finn, said their goodbyes.

  • $150K grant for real-world engineering

    Food trucks may have their avid followers, but in nine months or so, villagers can look for a small fleet of food “trikes” to join the outdoor culinary ranks.

WP2Social Auto Publish Powered By : XYZScripts.com