Jul
06
2020

Articles by Carol Simmons

More Articles by Carol Simmons
  • YS Schools to resume in-person classes with new academic year

    Yellow Springs Schools will begin the 2020–21 school year with a resumption of “regular, in-person classes,” Superintendent Terri Holden has announced. Families with “vulnerable” students, however, will be offered an online learning option.

  • Racism in village often covert

    The YS Community Foundation Encore Miller Fellows helped support the Courageous Conservations series, organized by The 365 Project and the Yellow Springs Havurah to address issues of race. Here, one local group met earlier this year. From left is David Seitz, Vivian Markley, Kirk Weigand, Megan Bachman, Mori Rothman, Karen McKee, Moya Shea, Marianne MacQueen, Lauren Heaton (obscured), and Locksley Orr. Also participating in the group was Rich Bullock and Encore Miller Fellow Jalyn Roe, who co-facilitated with MacQueen. A new round of Courageous Conversations is starting up in the fall. Those interested in participating should contact Encore Miller Fellow Len Kramer at len2654@gmail.com, or 937-572-4840. (Submitted photo)

    Facing Race: This is first in a series on the impacts of racism in Yellow Springs and local anti-racist efforts and activities.

  • Prosecutor: evidence supports self defense in Grinnell Road double fatal shooting

    The Greene County Grand Jury’s recent conclusion concerning the double fatal shooting Feb 12 outside a home on Grinnell Road — which the county sheriff described at the time as a “shootout” — confirmed the initial impression of law enforcement at the scene that gray winter morning: self-defense.

  • No charges in Grinnell shooting

    No charges will be filed in the double fatal shooting that occurred Feb. 12 outside a home on Grinnell Road, just south of Yellow Springs, the Greene County prosecutor has announced.

  • Schools prepare to reopen Aug. 27

    From left, Jack Hutchings, Maddox Fry, Era Creepingbear and Alayna Hamilton were among the Mills Lawn students who took part in Hour of Code last week, an international movement designed to introduce children of all ages to computer science and coding. Megan Bennett’s third-grade class was already ahead of the curve, having completed a project-based learning, or PBL, project called “Coding Cadets” this fall. The third graders took their coding knowledge to their older and younger peers, coaching each Mills Lawn class in the basics of creating with code. (Photo by Audrey Hackett)

    The current message from Ohio’s governor is that schools will reopen in the fall, but local districts will have a great deal of control over how that happens and what the return looks like, Yellow Springs Schools Superintendent Terri Holden told the local school board last week.

  • YS Development Corporation— Educational commons explored

    Antioch College Main Building.

    Conversations have begun between several of Yellow Springs’ educational institutions that could lead to novel partnerships and possibly significant changes in the local learning landscape.

  • School district extends meal program

    School may have concluded for the summer, but the Yellow Springs student lunch and breakfast program is continuing for an additional month, through the end of June.

  • Yellow Springs Schools— District faces funding cuts, uncertainty

    A $300 million cut in funding to Ohio schools this fiscal year, announced by Gov. Mike DeWine in May, will mean the loss of more than $140,000 in anticipated revenue for Yellow Springs Schools over May and June, according to state and district administrators.

  • Crash victim known for kindness, heart

    Abstracts by local artists Martin Borchers will be on display in a collaborative show, “Artifacts of Vacuity,” at The Winds Cafe that opens Jan. 15. (photos by Aaron Zaremsky)

    By all accounts, Martin Harold Benedict Borchers was in a pretty good place in his life Wednesday morning, May 27, before the car he was driving went off the right side of a narrow country road and hit a utility pole head on.

  • Speakers focus on hope, resilience

    There’s no denying that the class of 2020 has had a difficult, and in many ways disappointing, finish to the academic year. But the two new graduates chosen to speak for their class at Wednesday evening’s commencement ceremony are focusing on resilience, compassion and hope as they move into the next chapter of their lives.