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Sep
18
2019
Yellow Springs
76°
broken clouds
humidity: 78%
wind: 7mph SSW
H 80 • L 76

Articles About protest

  • John Crawford III memorial — Turnout, resolve at 5th anniversary

    John Crawford III is not forgotten. That was the main message Monday evening at a memorial along Pentagon Boulevard, outside the Walmart where Crawford, a 22-year-old black man, was shot and killed by a white Beavercreek police officer five years ago.  

  • No cages, no walls

    Dorothee Buron, of Yellow Springs, foreground, was one of about a half dozen villagers, along with about 60 others, who gathered near the office of Congressman Mike Turner (R-Dayton), on Tuesday, July 2, to protest the inhumane treatment of immigrants. (Photo by Megan Bachman)

    Around 60 protesters gathered near the office of Congressman Mike Turner (R-Dayton), on Tuesday, July 2, as part of a nationwide protest at 184 locations to demand action on the inhumane treatment of immigrants.

  • A place of peace

    Longtime villager Peg Champney stands at the corner of Livermore Street and Xenia Avenue, part of an ongoing peace protest that has been raising awareness to passersby for more than 15 years. (Submitted photo by Luciana Lieff)

    Longtime villager, Quaker and former Yellow Springs News co-owner Peg Champney stands at the corner of Livermore Street and Xenia Avenue, part of an ongoing peace protest.

  • Ohio EPA hears quarry concerns

    About 300 citizens packed the cafeteria of Greenon High School last Thursday to oppose a planned limestone quarrying project in Mad River Township, a few miles north of Yellow Springs. Ohio EPA organized the hearing, which was focused on one aspect of the project, a permit for wastewater discharge from the quarry. (Photo by Audrey Hackett)

    About 300 citizens packed the cafeteria of Greenon High School Feb. 1, voicing public opposition to a limestone quarrying plan a few miles north of Yellow Springs.

  • Taking the knee, together

    Protesters at Saturday’s action took a knee and sang the national anthem while kneeling on one knee, a gesture of solidarity with NFL players who have done the same during the anthem. Pictured here, from left, are villagers Kelly Fox, Tina Fox, Dan Dixon, Maria Bakari, Sherry Walker and Aiysha Walker. (Photo by Audrey Hackett)

    At least 65 local protesters “took the knee” for racial justice last Saturday.

  • Activists are awake and watching

    Yellow Springs resident Susan Alberter (left front), the driving force behind Greene County Indivisible: Awake and Watching, was among a number of group members who participated in a rally Tuesday, Sept. 5, in downtown Dayton to protest the president’s efforts to rescind President Barack Obama’s executive order known as DACA, or Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals. An estimated 100 people, many from Yellow Springs, gathered outside U.S. Rep. Mike Turner’s regional office to urge Turner to help retain the legal status of 800,000 young people called “Dreamers.” (Photo by Carol Simmons)

    They’ve been dressing up in chicken suits each Monday and visiting downtown Dayton with signs suggesting that U.S. Representative Mike Turner, whose regional office is there, might be “a chicken” for not meeting yet this year with local constituents in a town hall setting.

  • A Free Press in a State of Hate

    Resist!

    I’ve noticed that many around us are feeling overwhelmed and fatigued. Through listening, I’ve learned that what many of us are experiencing in this intensity for the first time is what billions of people of color feel each and every day.

  • Vigils to resume with new executions

    After a 3½-year moratorium on executions, Ohio prison officials are preparing to put convicted killer Ronald Phillips to death on Tuesday, July 26. Villager Carl Hyde plans to be in vigil outside Lucasville Prison.

  • Some pull ‘green’ from local bank

    At least 90 people turned out for a peaceful protest at U.S. Bank last Saturday, including one of the youngest in the crowd, Harriet Christle, nearly 3, pictured here with her paper bird. Organized by villager MJ Gentile, Saturday’s action sought to highlight U.S. Bank’s lending ties to the Dakota Access Pipeline and private prison operators. Several demonstrators closed their accounts Saturday, while others sent letters to the bank’s CEO to express their concerns. (Photo by Audrey Hackett)

    Megan Bachman has been banking with U.S. Bank since she was 15 years old. “It was the first account I ever had,” she said. But last Saturday, Feb. 4, she decided to move her money elsewhere.

  • Community unity powers D.C. Women’s March

    After riding through the night via chartered bus, and deposited in a Washington, D.C., parking lot after sunrise Saturday, Jan. 21, 55 women from Yellow Springs prepared to join hundreds of thousands of people from across the country streaming toward the National Mall for Saturday’s Women’s March on Washington. The bus passengers represented a portion of village residents who particpated in the historic event. (Submitted photo by Lydia, the busdriver)

    Local preparation for last weekend’s Women’s March on Washington may have been as significant for many Yellow Springs women, and for the community at large, as the actual march itself.