Jul
02
2020

Articles About protest

  • Solidarity on Stonewall anniversary

    What happened at Stonewall in NYC 1969, was a riot against the police. It wasn’t in answer to just a few homophobic police officers targeting our social havens in one city. This was a manifestation of our rage against the socially, politically, legally sanctioned nationwide assault on our culture.

  • YSPD, Yellow Springs Schools issue statements on recent police killings

    This week, Yellow Springs Police Chief Brian Carlson and Yellow Springs Schools Superintendent Terri Holden released statements addressing the recent death of George Floyd at the hands of police in Minneapolis, and the ongoing issues of police brutality against people of color in the country.

  • Signs of the times

    About 50 YSHS students walked out of class on Friday afternoon to join in the worldwide Climate Strike, a series of youth-led rallies in advance of the UN Climate Action Summit on Monday, Sept. 23.

  • John Crawford III memorial — Turnout, resolve at 5th anniversary

    John Crawford III is not forgotten. That was the main message Monday evening at a memorial along Pentagon Boulevard, outside the Walmart where Crawford, a 22-year-old black man, was shot and killed by a white Beavercreek police officer five years ago.  

  • No cages, no walls

    Dorothee Buron, of Yellow Springs, foreground, was one of about a half dozen villagers, along with about 60 others, who gathered near the office of Congressman Mike Turner (R-Dayton), on Tuesday, July 2, to protest the inhumane treatment of immigrants. (Photo by Megan Bachman)

    Around 60 protesters gathered near the office of Congressman Mike Turner (R-Dayton), on Tuesday, July 2, as part of a nationwide protest at 184 locations to demand action on the inhumane treatment of immigrants.

  • A place of peace

    Longtime villager Peg Champney stands at the corner of Livermore Street and Xenia Avenue, part of an ongoing peace protest that has been raising awareness to passersby for more than 15 years. (Submitted photo by Luciana Lieff)

    Longtime villager, Quaker and former Yellow Springs News co-owner Peg Champney stands at the corner of Livermore Street and Xenia Avenue, part of an ongoing peace protest.

  • Village Council — Meister supporters speak out

    Village Council’s Monday, Jan. 22, meeting was standing room only as more than 50 villagers pressed into Council chambers. Many had come to voice their support for Officer David Meister.

  • Ohio EPA hears quarry concerns

    About 300 citizens packed the cafeteria of Greenon High School last Thursday to oppose a planned limestone quarrying project in Mad River Township, a few miles north of Yellow Springs. Ohio EPA organized the hearing, which was focused on one aspect of the project, a permit for wastewater discharge from the quarry. (Photo by Audrey Hackett)

    About 300 citizens packed the cafeteria of Greenon High School Feb. 1, voicing public opposition to a limestone quarrying plan a few miles north of Yellow Springs.

  • Taking the knee, together

    Protesters at Saturday’s action took a knee and sang the national anthem while kneeling on one knee, a gesture of solidarity with NFL players who have done the same during the anthem. Pictured here, from left, are villagers Kelly Fox, Tina Fox, Dan Dixon, Maria Bakari, Sherry Walker and Aiysha Walker. (Photo by Audrey Hackett)

    At least 65 local protesters “took the knee” for racial justice last Saturday.

  • Activists are awake and watching

    Yellow Springs resident Susan Alberter (left front), the driving force behind Greene County Indivisible: Awake and Watching, was among a number of group members who participated in a rally Tuesday, Sept. 5, in downtown Dayton to protest the president’s efforts to rescind President Barack Obama’s executive order known as DACA, or Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals. An estimated 100 people, many from Yellow Springs, gathered outside U.S. Rep. Mike Turner’s regional office to urge Turner to help retain the legal status of 800,000 young people called “Dreamers.” (Photo by Carol Simmons)

    They’ve been dressing up in chicken suits each Monday and visiting downtown Dayton with signs suggesting that U.S. Representative Mike Turner, whose regional office is there, might be “a chicken” for not meeting yet this year with local constituents in a town hall setting.