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Sep
30
2020

Articles About protest :: Page 3

  • Yellow Springs Sister March draws at least 250

    The Yellow Springs Sister March drew at least 250 villagers on Saturday, many expressing positive, pro-women messages, some of them playful. The local march was organized by local seventh-graders Carina Basora and Ava Schell. (Photo by Audrey Hackett)

    A local Sister March organized by two seventh-graders drew more than 250 people in peaceful protest in downtown Yellow Springs on Saturday.

  • YSPD chief resigns; villagers demand better policing

    More than 250 villagers crowded into the Bryan Center gym Tuesday night for a special Council meeting about tensions with police at the New Year’s Eve Ball Drop. About 40 people spoke, including Ian MacDonald, above. (Photo by Dylan Taylor-Lehman)

    On Tuesday evening a crowd overflowing the Bryan Center gym heard a statement from Police Chief Dave Hale offering his resignation in the aftermath of what many perceived as overly aggressive and hostile police behavior at the New Year’s Eve Ball Drop.

  • Local men and women Stand Up!

    A group of about 250 demonstrators gathered on Xenia Avenue last week to “repudiate the bigotry and disgraceful behavior” exemplified by Trump’s comments on the “Access Hollywood” video. Among them were, from left, Will Gregor, Teresa Dunphy, Tommaso Gregor, Beth Holyoke and Andy Holyoke. (Photo by Matt Minde)

    Last Wednesday, Xenia Avenue was lined, as it sometimes is, with people holding signs with bold political slogans and rallying for social justice for women.

  • A powerful silence

    Among those attending the village's Black Lives Matter silent vigil were, from left, Terry Graham, Dhyana Graham and Douglas Klappich, all of Yellow Springs. (Photo by Diane Chiddister)

    More than 150 villagers lined Xenia Avenue for an hour beginning at noon last Sunday in silent protest against recent shootings of blacks.

  • Revisiting Crawford, two years on

    Yellow Springs residents played a large role in calling for justice after the 2014 police shooting of John Crawford III in a Beavercreek Walmart. Here, from left, villagers Joan Chappelle, Cheryl Smith and Bomani Moyenda were among area residents demonstrating at the Greene County courthouse in Xenia in December of 2014. Nearly two years after Crawford’s shooting, many questions remain. (News archive Photo by Lauren Heaton)

    First article in this series: The shooting of John Crawford and other young African-American men by police raised urgent questions about use of force, police relations with African-American communities and the role of race and racism in the justice system.

  • Black Lives Matter marks a year — Message of justice carries on

    Dozens of people participated in a rally and die-in at the Beavercreek Walmart on Wednesday, Aug. 5, to commemorate the life of John Crawford III, who was killed by police in the store a year ago. The event was organized by Black Lives Matter Miami Valley and included many local residents. (Photo by Dylan Taylor-Lehman)

    On Aug. 5, 2015, over 200 people gathered in the parking lot of the Beavercreek Walmart to commemorate the life and mourn the death of John Crawford III.

  • Yellow Springs Scouts for Equality celebrate victory

    Cub Scout Bobby Wyatt holds an "Inclusive Scouting Award" distributed by the Scouts for Equality. The symbolic badge signals a scout is tolerant and inclusive. (Submitted photo by Lake Miller)

    The local chapter of Scouts for Equality celebrated a victory Monday as the national chapter of the Boy Scouts of America (BSA) announced it would remove the ban on gay and lesbian adults from joining.

  • Old symbols fly, burn on 4th of July

    As thousands attended last Saturday’s 4th of July fireworks at Gaunt Park, about 30 members of the Greene County Black Lives Matter group burned a Confederate flag in protest of recent church burnings, the Charleston massacre of nine African Americans, and the police shooting last year of John Crawford in the Beavercreek Walmart. Shown above is group member Talis Gage. (Photo by Aaron Zaremsky)

    As American flags waved all around town on Saturday, July 4, one Confederate flag, a former symbol of the American South, burned as a reminder of the lack of freedom many black citizens have suffered since the Civil War and before.