Nov
21
2018
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Wednesday
High 40° / Low 23°
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Thursday
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Kineta Sanford

Sanford selected for Council

Kineta Sanford has been appointed to fill the vacant seat on Village Council. Council approved the 26-year-old villager in a 5-0 vote at its Nov. 19 meeting. Sanford fills the seat vacated by Judith Hempfling, who announced her resignation in September citing personal reasons. Sanford will serve through 2019, when Hempfling’s term was set to expire.

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Arts (archives)

  •   Bringing peace to all

    The 15-year-old weekly Saturday morning peace vigil at the intersection of Limestone Street and Xenia Avenue was elevated by the voices of more than 80 singers intoning a simple round to the words, “Hate has no home here.” The singers, all of them women, were participants in the annual Midwest regional Threshold Choir gathering. (Photo by Matt Minde)The 15-year-old weekly Saturday morning peace vigil at the intersection of Limestone Street and Xenia Avenue was elevated by the voices of more than 80 singers, participants in the annual Midwest regional Threshold Choir gathering.

  •   MLS all-school musical — ‘Lion King KIDS’ springs to life

    In rehearsal: The circle of life continues as the lion Simba, played by James White; the shaman Rafiki, played by Gini Meekin; and lioness Nalla, performed by Ru Robertson, celebrate the birth of a new generation at the conclusion of “Lion King KIDS,” which Mills Lawn School will present in two performances Thursday, Nov. 15, at 12:30 and 7 p.m, at Central State University’s Paul Robeson theater in Wilberforce. (Photo by Carol Simmons)Mills Lawn Elementary has transformed into the Pride Lands this fall as students prepare for a production of “Lion King KIDS,” a stage adaptation for youth of the popular, animated Disney movie and subsequent Tony Award-winning Broadway musical.

  •   Bulldog Theatre Festival — Two plays address timely issues

    Yellow Springs High School/McKinney School performing arts teacher Lorrie Sparrow-Knapp directed students in English teacher Desiree Nickell’s class as they studied “Romeo and Juliet” recently. From left to right are students Dezmond Wilson, Matt Duncan, Carina Basora and Vera Roberts. Shakespeare’s classic work is one of two plays being performed as part of the Bulldog Theatre Festival. The first play, “Girls Like That,” runs Nov. 2–4; “Romeo and Juliet” is the following weekend, Nov. 9–11.(Submitted photo by Desiree Nickel)The two productions — one contemporary, one classical — on the docket for this fall’s Bulldog Theater Festival deal with social pressure, expectations and violence.

Village Schools (archives)

  •   New grants for Agraria —  Kids get the dirt on soil education

    Mills Lawn third-graders Emery Fodal and Wyatt Fagan counted soil invertebrates using Berlese Funnels at Agraria last spring. They also kept data on soil temperature levels over a four-week period at the farm. (Submitted photo by Peg Morgan)The architect and inventor Buckminster Fuller often used a metaphor to illustrate how small targeted actions can move massive systems. Fuller noted that the “trim tab,” a tiny mechanism of a ship’s rudder, can change the ship’s course with a minute movement. At the Agraria Center for Regenerative Agriculture, soil is seen as that “trim tab.”

  •   Live from Mills Lawn, it’s Tuesday morning!

    Mills Lawn student Aiden Gustafson works the camera as, from left, Stella Platt, Gabriella Kibblewhite and Tiger Collins get ready to broadcast the news on WMLS. (Photo by Carla Steiger)“Good morning, amazing MLS students!” announced Mills Lawn sixth-grader Tiger Collins on a Tuesday last month. Flanked by fellow students Gabriella Kibblewhite and Stella Platt, she began broadcasting the daily news at Mills Lawn.

  •   MLS all-school musical — ‘Lion King KIDS’ springs to life

    In rehearsal: The circle of life continues as the lion Simba, played by James White; the shaman Rafiki, played by Gini Meekin; and lioness Nalla, performed by Ru Robertson, celebrate the birth of a new generation at the conclusion of “Lion King KIDS,” which Mills Lawn School will present in two performances Thursday, Nov. 15, at 12:30 and 7 p.m, at Central State University’s Paul Robeson theater in Wilberforce. (Photo by Carol Simmons)Mills Lawn Elementary has transformed into the Pride Lands this fall as students prepare for a production of “Lion King KIDS,” a stage adaptation for youth of the popular, animated Disney movie and subsequent Tony Award-winning Broadway musical.

Economy (archives)

  •   Environmental news — EPA responds to Vernay cleanup plan

    YSI Senior Scientist Jessica Moyer displayed the flag the company received for an Ohio EPA Encouraging Environmental Excellence award at its Brannum Lane facility. YSI received the highest level — platnium —for its work to conserve resources at their facility and in the wider community. YSI, now owned by Xylem, is a 70-year-old local company that designs and manufacturers water sampling and monitoring instruments used around the globe and in the region, including by the Ohio EPA. (Photo by Megan Bachman)It’s been 16 years since Vernay Laboratories began working under order of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to develop a plan to clean up contamination at and around the company’s former manufacturing facility at 875 Dayton St. But Vernay has more work to do before its final cleanup plan is approved.

  •   Cresco Labs opens its doors

    Cultivation agent Jerico Castillo pruned cannabis plants this week in an indoor greenhouse at Cresco’s medical marijuana facility in Yellow Springs. Visit ysnews.com for more photos from the Cresco tour. (Photo by Megan Bachman)On Monday, Oct. 8, Cresco Labs of Yellow Springs opened its doors to local media and public officials for a ribbon-cutting ceremony and facility tour of the medical marijuana grower.

  •   An inside look at Cresco Labs

    Yesterday Cresco Labs of Yellow Springs opened its doors to a small group of local media and public officials for a ribbon-cutting ceremony and facility tour of the medical marijuana grower.

Village Life (archives)

  •   Two-hour delay this morning

    Two-hour delay.

  •   New grants for Agraria —  Kids get the dirt on soil education

    Mills Lawn third-graders Emery Fodal and Wyatt Fagan counted soil invertebrates using Berlese Funnels at Agraria last spring. They also kept data on soil temperature levels over a four-week period at the farm. (Submitted photo by Peg Morgan)The architect and inventor Buckminster Fuller often used a metaphor to illustrate how small targeted actions can move massive systems. Fuller noted that the “trim tab,” a tiny mechanism of a ship’s rudder, can change the ship’s course with a minute movement. At the Agraria Center for Regenerative Agriculture, soil is seen as that “trim tab.”

  •   The Great War that transformed the village

    This 1918 photo shows some of the Antioch College students who joined the Student’s Army Training Corps, a federal program in which male college students were given military training while taking college courses. To be part of the national World War I program, the college had to turn a dormitory into a military barracks. Fifty-four students took part in the training, which included marching around campus in formation. (photo courtesy of Scott Sanders, Antiochiana, Antioch College)On Feb. 14, 1919, the Yellow Springs News published a long list on its front page, spanning the entire length of the paper. It was the “Roll of Honor,” a list of all villagers who had served, or were serving, in the Army during the First World War, which had recently ended.

Government (archives)

Obituaries (archives)

Higher Education (archives)

  •   A partnership for Wilberforce and Antioch

    Antioch College and Wilberforce University are both small, private liberal arts colleges in Greene County. They were both founded in the 1850s. And in recent years they’ve both been trying to bounce back from financial and accreditation woes.

  •   Antioch College: new class, new hope

    A group of incoming Antioch students dined on Mediterranean-style food at the Birch Hall’s dining hall last week. From left is India Nunn, Bre Chaver, Akili Hayden, Ashanti Walker and Amanda Seigel. (Photo by Megan Bachman)A decade after Antioch College closed, and seven years after it reopened to students as an independent institution, rebirth has been slow. But those struggles didn’t dampen spirits on campus last week, where the mood was one of optimism and excitement.

  •   Antioch recognized for sustainability practices

    The college's first crew of four-legged lawnmowers in 2015, shown with Farm Manager Kat Christen and then-student and Farm Assistant Alli King.Antioch College has been recognized as a top performer in the 2018 Sustainable Campus Index.

Sports (archives)