Apr
25
2017
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Articles by Carol Simmons

More Articles by Carol Simmons
  • YSHS production of ‘Oklahoma!’ has legs — about 90

    Yellow Springs High School is presenting the Rodgers and Hammerstein classic “Oklahoma!” this month, with performance dates April 21–23 and 28–30 at Antioch’s Foundry Theater. Directed by Ed Knapp, the musical is still relevant to contemporary teens, according to several of the Yellow Springs actors stepping into starring roles. (Photo by Carol Simmons)

    The Yellow Springs High School musical production of ‘Oklahoma!’ has legs — about 90 of them

  • Friends use art to confront illness

    A new Yellow Springs Arts Council show, “Bosom Buddies,” opens on Friday, April 21, with a reception from 6 to 9 p.m. The show was inspired by the art created by Corrine Bayraktaroglu and friends during her bout with cancer. Other community members are invited to submit to the show art that’s linked to breast cancer. Shown above are Bayraktaroglu and her good friend, Nancy Mellon, who together are known as the JafaGirls. (Photo by Carol Simmons)

    “Corrine deals with everything through art,” said Nancy Mellon, speaking recently of her dear friend and frequent art-making collaborator Corrine Bayraktaroglu. The “everything” in this case is breast cancer.

  • Beloved Community aim is inclusion

    The Beloved Community Project seeks to address issues of poverty, hunger, racism, discrimination, inclusion, justice and peace within Yellow Springs. The next community event is planned Wednesday, April 19, beginning at 6 p.m. with a free meal, at the Presbyterian Church. Pictured at a recent gathering are Miriam Eckenrode Saari, Sommer McGuire and Beloved Community organizer the Rev. Aaron Saari. (Photo by Carol Simmons)

    A group of Yellow Springs residents have launched The Beloved Community Project, with which they hope to address issues of poverty, hunger, racism, discrimination, inclusion, justice and peace within the village.

  • Celebrating Persia’s new year

    Nacim Sabaji, left, was the organizing force behind a celebration of the traditional Persian holiday Nowruz on Saturday evening, March 25, at the Presbyterian Church. About 150 people, including many from the area’s Iranian-American community and the local Baha’i membership, ate traditional Persian foods, learned about the secular holiday’s customs and closed out the fete with dancing. The joyful gathering stood as a testament against negative depictions of people from Iran as well as travel ban efforts that include Iran among the targeted countries. (Photos by Carol Simmons)

    The joy of family, the joy of community, the joy of spring all filled the social hall at First Presbyterian Church last Saturday as nearly 150 people of all ages gathered to celebrate the Persian holiday of Nowruz.

  • Celebrating dance and community

    The annual Valerie Blackwell-Truitt Community Dance Concert will take place next Friday and Saturday, March 10 and 11, at 7:30 p.m. at the Antioch College Foundry Theater. (Submitted photo)

    Locally based dancer Valerie Blackwell-Truitt might have become a professional singer. But dance is what called her.

  • Antioch School kids tell Bill Mullins’ story

    The Antioch School’s Older Group was recently immersed in storytelling and theater, thanks to special guest Christopher Westhoff, of the Mad River Theater Works performing arts company, who spent a portion of each day last week at the school. Westhoff helped students develop their own play about the life and influence of retired Older Group teacher Bill Mullins, which they performed last Friday. Pictured, from left, are Max Florkey, Merida Kuder-Wexler, Ayla Current, Lucy Dennis, Jackson Grote and Antonio Chaiten. (Photo by Carol Simmons)

    A recent theatrical storytelling residency at the Antioch School became an opportunity to learn and share a story from their own community history via the medium of live theater.

  • Conference digs into new research on soil health

    Arthur Morgan Institute for Community Solutions is hosting a symposium Friday and Saturday, Feb. 24–25, that is devoted to the topic of soil.

  • Community unity powers D.C. Women’s March

    After riding through the night via chartered bus, and deposited in a Washington, D.C., parking lot after sunrise Saturday, Jan. 21, 55 women from Yellow Springs prepared to join hundreds of thousands of people from across the country streaming toward the National Mall for Saturday’s Women’s March on Washington. The bus passengers represented a portion of village residents who particpated in the historic event. (Submitted photo by Lydia, the busdriver)

    Local preparation for last weekend’s Women’s March on Washington may have been as significant for many Yellow Springs women, and for the community at large, as the actual march itself.

  • Local women to march on D.C.

    From left, Linda Sikes, Eve Fleck, Kate Mooneyham and Katie Rose Wright gathered Monday evening at Fleck’s home to crochet and knit pink, cat-eared “pussy” hats for participants in the Women’s March on Washington, Jan. 21, to wear. The women are participating in the Pussyhat Project, a national initiative tied to the march. Local resident Annie Blanchard is set to host several other hat-making gatherings at the Emporium at 10 a.m. Wednesday, Jan. 11, and Friday, Jan. 13. (Photo by Carol Simmons)

    On Saturday, Jan. 21, the day after the presidential inauguration, hundreds of thousands of women from across the United States are planning to converge on the nation’s capital for the Women’s March on Washington.

  • Friends Music Camp fundraiser— A holiday blast of musical talent

    The annual holiday concert of staff and campers of Friends Music Camp will take place Friday, Dec. 30, at 7:30 p.m. at the Foundry Theater on the Antioch campus. Staff members and professional musicians Wendy Champney Enderle and Martha Hyde will perform, along with cellist Chiara Enderle, violinist Mathias Enderle and former campers Sam Salazar and Rory Papania, among others. The event raises money for camper scholarships. Shown above, Papania performed at the group’s 2016 summer benefit, which also took place in Yellow Springs. (News archive photo by Matt Minde)

    As the year comes to a close, an event that has become a tradition of the winter holiday season in Yellow Springs looks ahead as well to the warmth of summer and the tradition of summer camp, specifically Friends Music Camp, or FMC.

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