Dec
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2016
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Articles by Carol Simmons

More Articles by Carol Simmons
  • Art gleams anew at Holiday Jumble

    The Holiday Art Jumble returns to Yellow Springs for its fifth year. A fundraiser for the Yellow Springs Arts Council, the “grand reshuffling” of art and artifacts is being held in the council’s Corry Street gallery during regular gallery hours, 1–4 p.m. Wednesdays–Sundays, now through Dec. 31. It is closed Nov. 24 and Dec. 25. Items will continue to be accepted through Dec. 20. (Submitted photo by Corrine Bayraktaroglu)

    The YS Arts Council’s 2016 Holiday Jumble opened to the public on Saturday, Nov. 19, and will run through Dec. 31.

  • 34 artists to participate in 2016 Art & Soul

    Zazu Metcalf (top) creates cards (such as the bottom image), while her mother, Colette Palamar, creates sun and winter hats for babies, kids and adults (one is pictured here on Zazu). The mother-daughter duo are among 34 artists from Ohio and Indiana exhibiting at the fifth annual Art & Soul fair, held this Saturday, Nov. 19, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. at Mills Lawn School gymnasium. (Submitted Photos)

    A wide range of original arts and crafts creations—both decorative and functional—will be featured this weekend in the fifth annual Art & Soul fair, in the Mills Lawn School gymnasium.

  • State House, Senate races— Hometown challengers fall short

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    Two Yellow Springs hopefuls for state office fell short of their goal Tuesday night against Republican incumbents who decidedly retained their seats in the Ohio Senate and House.

  • U.S. House and Senate: Republicans keep Congress

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    Moderate Republican incumbents held& on firmly to their seats in Ohio’s U.S. Congressional races.

  • Building an historic collection at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of African American History and Culture

    Smithsonian Institution. Tuliza Fleming, a YS High School graduate, is the curator of art for the Smithsonian’s recently opened National Museum of African American History and Culture in Washington, D.C. Named to the position in 2007, she was tasked with creating the then yet-to-be-built museum’s permanent art collection. She’s shown here in 2014. (Submitted photo by Michael R. Barnes)

    The opening of the Smithsonian’s new National Museum of African American History and Culture on the National Mall in September followed more than a century of efforts to recognize formally in our nation’s Capital the contributions of black Americans in the making, building, growth and life of this country.

  • Debut of new Open Studios tour

    Painter Libby Rudolf will be one of 34 artists participating in this weekend’s Yellow Springs Open Studios, a free, two-day event that will highlight some of the creative work being made in and around the village. Rudolf’s Grinnell Road home, where she maintains her studio, will be one of 24 stops on the self-guided tour, 11 a.m.–5 p.m. Saturday and Sunday, Oct.14–15. (Photo by Carol Simmons)

    The third weekend in October has become widely known among area artists and art lovers as a time to celebrate and support art-making in Yellow Springs.

  • Community Solutions’ 63rd conference — A focus on climate solutions

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    The 76-year-old Community Solutions will hold its 63rd conference, “Climate Crisis Solutions: Charting a New Course.” The event dates are Friday–Sunday, Oct. 21–23. Seventeen local, national and international experts will speak.

  • Big debate, big screen at Little Art

    The house was packed Monday night at the Little Art Theatre for a Debate Watch Party presented in partnership with ThinkTV, Channel 16, the local PBS affiliate. Viewers at the free event watched a live stream of the historic presidential debate as it unfolded at Hofstra University in Long Island, N.Y., variously responding to the candidates’ pronouncements with jeers or applause. (Photo by Carol Simmons)

    A live stream of the candidates’ debate at Long Island’s Hoftra University and the Little Art’s programming leading up to it were presented through a partnership with ThinkTV, Channel 16, the Dayton-based PBS affiliate.

  • Art of collaboration, intersection

    ‘Migrations,’ a new art exhibition on display through October at The Winds Cafe and Bakery, features watercolors by Cathy Ledeker, left, and pen-and-ink and Prismacolor works by Penelope ‘Penny’ S. Adamson. The show is rooted in a 10-year friendship between the women tied to family and place. Around the corner from the Winds, the YS Arts Council Gallery is hosting a separate two-person exhibition, “Shared Views,” through Oct. 16. The Arts Council show features 25 pairs of paintings by villagers Sherraid Scott and Sigalia Cannon, who for more than 20 years have meet most Sundays to paint side-by-side at sites at various area locales. (Photo by Carol Simmons)

    Relationships form the girders on which two recently opened two-person art exhibitions in the village are built.

  • Seventy years on, still ‘Victorettes’

    A reunion this month of the Victorettes of Yellow Springs — a local service group formed during World War II of young African-American women to support the war effort — brought together eight of the original 17 members, including founder Dorothy Perry Boyce, now 95. From left: Phyllis Lawson Jackson, Anna Hull Johnson, Isabel Adams Newman, Marie Adams Perry Payton, founder Boyce, Dorothy Mundy Allen, Mary Hull Bowers and Betty Cordell Ford. (Photo by Carol Simmons)

    Love and pride of community, church, family, friendship and, not least of all, country — the Victorettes of Yellow Springs brought all these together for a group of young African-American women in their teens and early 20s during the final months of World War II.

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