From The Print Section :: Page 153

  • Joyce McCurdy retires — Imparting the complexity of past

    When Joyce McCurdy left her teaching job in Springfield and took a pay cut to come to Yellow Springs schools, classes were still being held at Bryan High School, right next to the train that ran through town. That was 1968

  • Morgan Fellow jobs to end in June— Antioch’s cultural presence, revived

    Morgan Fellows Jean Gregorek, left, Anne Bohlen and Scott Warren have been busy developing the curriculum and programming events at the revived college since September 2009. Their jobs come to an end on June 30. (Photo by Diane Chiddister)

    It didn’t take long after Antioch College became an independent liberal arts college in September 2009 for the revived college’s presence to be felt in the village.

  • A radical, rooted farm vision

    A layer hen perched on top of a motorcycle was not a strange sight at Amy Batchman’s new Radical Roots Farm on West Jackson Road, where Batchman plans to grow perennials, teach mechanics courses for women and move old barns. (Photo by Megan Bachman)

    Where can you learn how to repair a tractor, help move a barn, have chicks raised for you and eventually pick your own strawberries and buy fresh-pressed apple cider vinegar and hazelnut oil, all from a 29-year-old woman?

  • Antioch College — An overflow of first students

    For the first time in recent memory, the freshman class of Antioch College is over-enrolled.

  • Why so many voters?

    In last week’s special election, 1,088 local voters went to the polls out of 3,462 total registered voters in Yellow Springs, a turnout of 31 percent. But according to the 2010 Census, the village has a total adult population of only 2,799. How can the village have more registered voters than adults eligible to vote?

  • Efficiency program benefits businesses in many ways

    Local businesses looking to save money by cutting their fuel use now have an extra incentive to do so. Money that began as a fine against the Village for buying power from a polluting coal plant is coming home to help Yellow Springs businesses get energy-efficient.

  • Seniors make meaning from tragedy

    YSHS seniors Elise Giardullo and Gabe Amrhein will host a 24-hour relay “A Promise to Eben: No Text Is Worth Your Life,” to raise awareness of the dangers of driving and texting. The event takes place Saturday, May 28, at the high school, beginning at 9 a.m. (Photo by Lauren Heaton)

    The loss of a young life is always tragic, but two local young people hope to find meaning in that tragedy. The meaning sought by Elise Giardullo and Gabe Amrhein is their attempt to save other lives by educating young adults on the dangers of texting while driving.

  • Teachers Winks, Lemkau look back

    Yellow Springs High School teachers Shanna Winks and Phil Lemkau are retiring this year.

  • Investing in YS, making beauty

    On a modern rehab on North Walnut Street, Erik and Deirdre Owen of BauWow construction company gave an old 19th-century house new life, with the help of Bob Bingenheimer and Deb Slater Pictured are, from left, Bingenheimer and Erik Owen. (Photo by Megan Bachman)

    Call it the Miracle on Walnut Street. A dingy, dilapidated house — the eyesore of the neighborhood — is transformed into a stately, sleek modern home with a neighbor’s investment and a local couple’s vision.

  • Village lawsuit to soon go to trial

    After two years of discussion and official mediation, the legal dispute between the Village of Yellow Springs and a local property owner over the extension of Village water service to a property on Hyde Road has not been resolved.

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