Land & Environmental Section :: Page 14

  • Hello, dahlias! Looking swell, dahlias

    September is the height of dahlia season, and several growers in the village are feasting their eyes on their long-awaited prizes, which come in more varieties and colors than the average eye can appreciate. (photo by Lauren Heaton)

    Spring may be most flowers’ idea of a good time, but for those meticulously cultivated, brilliantly colored, dinner-plate-sized darlings known as dahlias, late August to mid-September is when the real party starts. And dahlias know how to have a good time.

  • Land trust supporters bid to save land

    Charlotte Battino contemplates placing a bid on an antique quilt donated by Mark French at land trust auction held in dowtown Springfield on Friday. (Photo by Megan Bachman)

    At the sixth annual Tecumseh Land Trust auction on Friday night, more than 200 farmland supporters bid on donated products and services, with all proceeds going to support the land trust.

  • A chicken farm to save the planet

    The chicks on New Liberty Farms on Mosier Road live in kid-size swimming pools lined with wood shavings and chirp sociably under warming lamps. (photo by Lauren Heaton)

    When local resident Kat Krehbiel hatched the idea for a local food farm, chickens were only a small part of the plan.

  • Murphy examines cars, consumption

    Recently Pat Murphy of Community Solutions published his third book on energy conservation, Spinning Our Wheels, in which he examines myths about the electric car.

    Electric cars may not be the answer to reducing our dependence on fossil fuels, says local author Pat Murphy in his recently-released book, Spinning Our Wheels. Instead, Murphy proposes, we should share rides to increase transportation’s efficiency and reduce the number of total cars on the road.

  • A group to support greening

    Kate LeVesconte showed off her garden and brand new bicycle carrier, which she fills with groceries from town for carbon-free transport to her home on Glen View Road. LeVesconte shares these energy conservation techniques at monthly meetings of the Ten Percent Club. (photo by Megan Bachman)

    Clinical psychologist Kate LeVesconte knows that support groups encourage positive behavior. So when she became concerned about the dangers of carbon fuel use, LeVesconte co-created an energy conservation support group, where people help each other live more sustainably.

  • Forest gardens in your own yard

    Permaculturist Dave Jacke hugged a stinging nettle plant at a farm homestead on Hustead Road, where he will teach a seven-day workshop on creating edible forest gardens next week. Jacke will also give a free public lectures at the Glen Helen building on homescale food production and enhancing soil fertility on Aug. 9 and 11.

    Growing food in a backyard garden can be a lot of work. But by designing a “forest garden” of trees and shrubs, aligned with ecological principles, gardeners can achieve a food yield sustainably, with less maintenance. This is the essence of a seven-day forest gardening workshop from Aug. 9 to Aug. 15 on a farm homestead north of Yellow Springs on Hustead Road…

  • Big trees wanted in the village

    Yellow Springs Tree Committee members Macy Reynolds, left, and Kathy Beverly are part of a summer effort by the committee to identify the biggest trees in the village. Villagers are invited to submit their contenders for the town’s biggest trees by calling Beverly at 767-2586.

    This summer the Yellow Springs Tree Committee is scouring the community for the next state champion tree. Several weeks ago, committee members Kathy Beverly and Macy Reynolds measured a 37-inch-circumference shagbark hickory at Mills Lawn School and a 55-inch-circumference oak tree on the Antioch campus, the largest yet.

  • In search of big trees

    Macy Reynolds, left, and Kathy Beverly of the Tree Committee measured the large oaks, hickories and locust trees of Mills Lawn on a recent summer day. (Photo by Megan Bachman)

    It’s no a surprise that Yellow Springs has an abundance of large trees. This summer the Yellow Springs Tree Committee seeks the largest in their update to a 1972 report, “The big trees of Yellow Springs.” See a 1972 map of the largest trees in Yellow Springs here.

  • Glen Helen fundraiser dinner—Finally, a use for honeysuckle

    Villager Dennis Moore is shown with the three chairs he constructed from honeysuckle that was pulled from the Glen. The chairs will be auctioned this Saturday, July 17, at the “Whoo Cooks for You?” fundraiser event at Glen Helen. While the dinner tickets are expected to be sold out, preregistered callers may bid on the chairs. Register to bid by calling 769-1902 or online at www.whoocooksforyou.org.

    When the barred owl sings its inquisitive call “whoo cooks for you?” this weekend, the folks at Glen Helen will have an answer. At a long dinner table at the Raptor Center on Sunday, July 18, area diners in support of the Glen will sit down to enjoy a meal whose origins are both known and local with the area chefs and farmers who grew and prepared the food.

  • Green towns offer new ideas

    As sustainability gains ground as an integral component of city planning, many municipalities across the country are creating ways to use less energy and ensure that the energy they use comes from renewable sources.

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