Land & Environmental Section :: Page 7

  • Oil and water— Drilling stirs new concerns

    West Bay Exploration, a Michigan oil and gas company, had received a permit from the Ohio Department of Natural Resources to drill an exploratory oil well on a Miami Township property. Shown is a temporary drilling rig in southern Michigan, which is somewhat larger than what would be used in this area. (Submitted photo by West Bay Exploration)

    In the late 1800s northwestern Ohio was at the center of an oil boom, and Ohio became the world’s largest oil producer. Soon drilling moved to eastern and central Ohio, which is today at the center of another fossil fuel boom

  • Canadian David Suzuki speaks after film— Environmental icon comes to YS

    Canadian environmentalist Dr. David Suzuki will speak at the Little Art Theatre in Yellow Springs following the screening of his autobiographical film, Force of Nature, at 7 p.m. on Sunday, April 15. (Submitted photo)

    If you had one last lecture to give, what would you say? In the film Force of Nature, Dr. David Suzuki, known as the godfather of the environmental movement in Canada, delivers a legacy lecture indicting humanity for undermining the planet’s life support systems.

  • Water pollution we all create— Catching up with runaway runoff

    There is a gully in the Glen at the northeast edge of the village, not far from the Glen Helen Building. When it rains, water comes rushing into the Glen, carrying with it the runoff from the village, its street oils, its lawn chemicals, and its trash.

  • Toxic sites are under control

    Over the past two decades, Vernay, along with Morris Bean & Company, YSI, Inc. and the Village Water Reclamation plant, have all been point sources of pollution to local ground and surface water. But through their efforts and work with the U.S. and Ohio Environmental Protection Agencies, all four point sources of area water pollution have made strides to control and mitigate the damage they caused to the local watershed.

  • Real watershed moments for area

    Hikers carefully navigated the stepping stones across Birch Creek in the Glen Helen Nature Preserve last weekend. The three local rivers that run through the Glen—Birch Creek, Yellow Springs Creek and the Little Miami River—drain runoff from village streets and area farms. Any contamination in the local watershed eventually makes its way into the Glen, impacting ecosystem health and recreational activities. (Photo by Megan Bachman)

    Where Yellow Springs begins and ends is defined by clear political boundaries. But the village also exists within an ecosystem that has boundaries of its own. An important one is its watershed, an area of land that drains into a common waterway.

  • Village water, from the ground up

    Ted Dunevant, operator of the Yellow Springs water plant for the past 26 years, is retiring at the end of this month. He’s shown in the water plant’s pump house, the last stop for local water before it’s pumped into the village. (Photo by Diane Chiddister)

    You could say the Yellow Springs water system began about 425 million years ago, when a large inland sea covered the area.

  • Many issues of village water

    Water. We can’t live without it. But chances are, we don’t spend much time thinking about it. And questions regarding water quality are edging closer to Yellow Springs.

  • Land preservationist shares expertise with the Glen

    Cascades

    Land preservationist Nancy Stranahan will give a talk on March 9 in the Glen about the efforts of her organization to preserve open spaces in southwest Ohio.

  • From sap to syrup

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    Michelle Burns and John Dewine of Flying Mouse Farms showed off their maple syrup operation on Sunday. See their “sugar shack” and more photos after the jump.

  • Blind pigs, turkeys, goats find home

    Nick Ormes cares for abandoned and neglected animals at the Ranch Menagerie Animal Sactuary on Village-owned property on US 68. He’s hoping to raise more money to feed his 73 animals through the winter and to raise awarness about the epidemic of stray, abandoned, neglected and abused animals. (Photo by Megan Bachman)

    Nick Ormes can rattle off from memory the animals he looks after on his 12-acre animal sanctuary on US 68. Abandoned or neglected by their owners, these animals faced a life of suffering or the slaughterhouse until Ormes, 58, stepped in to save them.

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