Village Life Section :: Page 64

  • YSI receives Third Frontier grant

    YSI Incorporated is one of six statewide projects recently funded by the Ohio Department of Development’s Third Frontier grant, which seeks to spur economic development in Ohio, YSI leaders found out recently.

  • Antioch Underground

    Drilling on the front lawn of the Antioch College to determine the feasibility of using geothermal heating

    On Friday, April 9, employees of Crabtree Drilling of Springfield and Eaton Drilling of West Liberty drilled 300 feet down on the front lawn of the Antioch College campus in a first step toward determining the feasibility of using geothermal heating on campus. (Click on the headline to read more)

  • Which came first, the bunny or the egg?

    The Easter Bunny will grace the slopes of Gaunt Park again with hundreds of brightly colored Easter eggs this Saturday.

    Amani Wagner, left, and Hailey Qualls bowed their heads to the wind and plucked as many eggs from the Gaunt Park hill as their baskets could hold.

  • Rodney Bean to leave Senior Center

    Rodney Bean will be leaving as director of the Senior Center, a post he has held for 11 years. (Photo by Lauren Heaton)

    Yellow Springs Senior Center director Rodney Bean feels that it’s time for a change, and as the center has been oriented toward campaigning for a new space, now seems like a good time to let someone new take the helm. On May 28 he will step down to let that happen.

  • Careful, now…

    Roy Woods of Bellefountaine

    Roy Woods of Bellefontaine was fully geared-up and having a good time, along with local young people at the Yellow Springs skate park.

  • Neighborhood gardens grow community, savings

    Neighborhood gardens — shared plots for gardening with others near and within neighborhoods on Village-owned land — are new to Yellow Springs, and may be growing on land near you this year.

  • TLT, AACW join for roots fest

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    Every year the local blues fest reminds community members about the roots of contemporary popular music. If gospel can spawn the blues, jazz, reggae and rap, then what can the art of the local community tell us about our own history and roots? African American Cross-Cultural Works and the Tecumseh Land Trust aim to find out when they put on the first ever Roots Fest on Saturday, March 27, at Bryan Community Center. It will be an evening of performances in which villagers use the arts to connect to and share their own stories.

  • Assessing the value of diversity

    For Jewell Graham, the 1950s, ’60s and ’70s were exhilarating times to live in the village. Having come to Yellow Springs as a young African-American woman with her new husband, Paul, who after graduating from Antioch had been offered a job at Vernay Laboratories, Graham was impressed with the quality of relationships between blacks and whites. Many businesses were integrated in a way unusual for the time, and a passion for the civil rights movement further brought people together. There was considerable socializing between blacks and whites in her world, as well as a sense of shared purpose.

  • Do housing costs affect diversity?

    If local diversity can be measured by the number of African Americans who live within the geographical boundaries of Yellow Springs, the village has experienced three decades of decreasing diversity, and is likely wrapping up a fourth. Since 1970, the village has lost about 500 African-American residents, mirroring a larger regional trend.

  • Here comes the sun

    Here comes the sun

    Lauren Sheets danced as Scott Lee of Kettering played and sang outside Brother Bear’s.

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