Dec
05
2019
Yellow Springs
45°
clear sky
humidity: 48%
wind: 9mph W
H 45 • L 42

Articles About Community-Supported Agriculture

  • Community Solutions conference— Hope in regenerative practices

    But messages of efficacy and hope, which can get lost in crisis turmoil, are at the heart of a three-day national conference Nov. 1–3 in Yellow Springs.
    “Pathways to Regeneration: Soil, Food, and Plant Medicine,” presented by the locally based Arthur Morgan Institute for Community Solutions, will offer alternative ways of thinking and acting.

  • Growing local—Coming home to their cows

    Scott and Jillian Marshall are in their seventh year of raising beef cattle at their West Jackson Road farm a few miles northeast of the village. The local farmers — who still have their day jobs — love caring for the cows, teaching their children about the cycle of life and serving customers with antibiotic-free, mostly grass-fed beef. (Photo by Megan Bachman)

    Although agriculture is Ohio’s No. 1 industry, most of what is grown in the state is not consumed here.

  • Yellow Springers to participate—Area food and farming event focuses on justice

    Onika Abraham, left, a farmer and educator who runs Farm School NYC, and Elizabeth Henderson, right, a pioneer of the Community-Supported Agriculture movement, and are the keynote speakers at this year’s Ohio Ecological Food and Farming Conference, at the Dayton Convention Center Feb. 14–16. Several Yellow Springs residents are also participating as workshop leaders and exhibitors. (Submitted photos)

    Farmer and educator Onika Abraham, a national leader of the food justice movement, believes that the current food system creates pockets where healthy food isn’t available. Just don’t call them food deserts.

  • Terry Joe Snider

    Terry Snyder at Heartbeat Farms. (Photo from heartbeatgardens.wordpress.com)

    Longtime villager Terry Snider died the morning of Dec. 22.

  • Local food activists strategize, plan for a commercial kitchen

    Last fall about 50 people toured the High Street garden of Al Schlueter, shown above gesturing during the tour. A second tour of Schlueter’s garden, along with those of Macy Reynolds and the Antioch Farm, takes place this Sunday, Aug. 14, beginning at 10:30 a.m. in the parking lot behind the Wellness Center. (Submitted photo)

    A growing interest among villagers around local food has led to an ambitious effort to make the village a regional food hub, with an initial step of creating a commercial kitchen as the first component of a community economic incubator.

  • CSAs for good food, local focus

    Doug Christen plants summer squash seeds at Smaller Footprint Farm, a certified “naturally-grown” farm that supplies vegetables for 30 local families. Farm shares, which cost $425 for 20 weeks of fresh produce, are available for the 2010 season. (Photo by Aaron Zaremsky)

    Both Smaller Footprint Farm and Heartbeat Community Farm have thrived since going into business in 2006 by growing vegetables directly for their members using a model called Community Supported Agriculture, or CSA for short.

  • Village gardens bloom with summer sights this Sunday

    The flower names from the various gardens read like a class roster from Antioch School. In one “classroom” there is Veronica, Spiraea, Yarrow and Daylily along with the Hosta triplets — Janet, June and Francee.