Oct
20
2019
Yellow Springs
54°
clear sky
humidity: 71%
wind: 6mph S
H 56 • L 54

Articles About invasive plants

  • Invasive of the month— Tree-of-heaven’s devilish dispersal

    Brought to this country in the 1700s as a horticultural specimen and shade tree, tree-of-heaven is one of North America’s most invasive tree species.

  • Invasive of the month— Japanese stiltgrass moves in

    Japanese stiltgrass is on the move in Yellow Springs, creeping into yards and forested areas. Here’s how to identify, and root out, this non-native invasive grass.

  • Invasive of the month— climbing vines

    Two invasives: Wintercreeper/euonymus, left, and Asian bittersweet, right, are two non-native invasive climbing vines widespread in Yellow Springs. (Photos by Audrey Hackett)

    If you see something green in winter, it’s probably wintercreeper, a non-native invasive species of euonymus. Asian bittersweet is a little harder to identify. It’s most noticeable in the fall, when its leaves are off and bright red berries and yellow seed capsules make the plant attractive to some.

  • Good green, bad green

    Not all green is “green.” That’s the message from local land managers who are combating a host of non-native invasive plant species that menace locally preserved and reclaimed lands. 

  • ‘Green death’ and other invasives

    Bradford pear trees, an invasive decorative tree which had been planted downtown, have gradually been replaced by American hornbeam, American yellowwood, Greenspire linden and Princeton elm, all native species. (Photo by Audrey Hackett)

    Drew Diehl calls it “the Green Death.” Pervasive in many areas, a single non-native species of honeysuckle — Amur honeysuckle — has transformed the local landscape over the last 30 years.