Oct
17
2019
Yellow Springs
44°
overcast clouds
humidity: 81%
wind: 13mph W
H 42 • L 41

Religion & Spirituality Section :: Page 2

  • BLOG—Poor Jerusalem

    Jerusalem was a backwater town controlled by a Semitic tribe called the Jebusites before King David cast his eyes upon it around 1000 BCE. He saw Jerusalem’s location and natural fortifications as being perfect for a great capital city that could transcended tribal identification and unite the people.

  • BLOG—Tacos, Tacos, Tacos!

    Miguel’s Tacos. Talented musicians making a joyful noise. Tables waiting to be turned into community centers. November 16, First Presbyterian, 6-9pm. All are welcome.

  • BLOG–“Refugee 101” and “Muslim Community Voices” offerings by the BCP

    As the current administration continues to threaten immigrants, refugees, and Muslims, let us be proactive in our resistance. You can help by simply taking surveys, attending events, and participating in conversations aimed at future action.

  • BLOG — Living Pilate, Living Christ

    In which a recovering biblical scholar long-windedly tries to say goodbye to Barry Dennen.

  • BLOG–Enacting MLK’s Beloved Community: Yellow Springs Edition

    What began with a community meeting in 2015 is culminating in a six-week journey this fall. Do we have the communal will to be in significant relationships with refugees and Muslims in the greater-Dayton area? 

  • BLOG — After the Story: The Grannies of Waitaha

    The balance between being a pastor and a reporter is sometimes difficult for me, in that I bring Pastor Aaron to interviews and stories where I should be looking with the eyes of a journalist.

  • A rare visit from Maori ‘grannies’

    Three Maori tribal elders of the Waitaha nation are visiting the village at the invitation of tribal priest Raymond Ruka, who lives in the Yellow Springs area. While here, the women, who are members of the Waitaha Grandmothers Executive Council, will offer prayers, earth blessings and storytelling, including at the local schools. Standing, from left, is Kathleen Ruka Wheremate and Jane Mihingarangi Ruka. Seated is Rosina “Rosie” Huriwai. (Photo by Aaron Saari)

    Only Raymond Ruka could have the tribal standing to extend the invitation that has brought three Maori tribal elders all the way from New Zealand to Yellow Springs. 

  • Hunter-gatherers

    Ariana Robinson, left, Lucy Definis and Ashby Lyons led the charge up Gaunt Park Hill on Saturday, during the annual village Easter egg hunt. (Photos by Diane Chiddister)

    The 2017 Central Chapel AME Church’s annual Gaunt Park Easter Egg Hunt took place last Saturday, April 15.

  • Celebrating Persia’s new year

    Nacim Sabaji, left, was the organizing force behind a celebration of the traditional Persian holiday Nowruz on Saturday evening, March 25, at the Presbyterian Church. About 150 people, including many from the area’s Iranian-American community and the local Baha’i membership, ate traditional Persian foods, learned about the secular holiday’s customs and closed out the fete with dancing. The joyful gathering stood as a testament against negative depictions of people from Iran as well as travel ban efforts that include Iran among the targeted countries. (Photos by Carol Simmons)

    The joy of family, the joy of community, the joy of spring all filled the social hall at First Presbyterian Church last Saturday as nearly 150 people of all ages gathered to celebrate the Persian holiday of Nowruz.

  • Eco-sattva: Climate compassion, action

    The Dharma Center and Community Solutions are partnering to offer an “eco-sattva” training beginning Jan. 12 to help villagers take mindful, effective action in response to climate change. Pictured outside the Dharma Center are, counterclockwise, course facilitators Saul Greenberg, Dione Greenberg and MJ Gentile, with Dharma Center Board Member Katie Egart. (Photo by Audrey Hackett)

    Eco-sattva, a blend of “ecology” and “bodhisattva,” the term refers to a person working for the well-being of all life in the face of environmental harm.