Articles From March 2011

  • Yellow Springs could recycle more

    Rumpke’s recycling facility on Monument Drive in Dayton whirred with the movement of belts, lifts, pulleys and crushers last month operating to support the sorting, mashing and packaging of waste materials to be shipped off and repurposed for another use. Recycling is alive in Yellow Springs, but it could be better. (Photo by Lauren Heaton)

    Yellow Springs has a relatively good recycling track record; Yellow Springers recycle about twice as much as residents of Germantown and about three times as much as Xenia residents.

  • New firm aims big for local solar

    From left, Scott Lindstrom, Shannon Lindstrom and Paul Wren launched their new company, Yellow Springs Renewable Energy, at a public forum last month. The local company, here with a solar photovoltaic panel, aims to provide residential, commercial and village-scale solar power.

    In October, a new local company, Yellow Springs Renewable Energy, held a public forum to educate the community on the renewable energy revolution taking place in the country and state their goal of leading that renewable energy revolution locally.

  • Food pantry need is on the rise

    Food pantry coordinator Patty McAllister sorts local food donations in the pantry located in the basement of the Yellow Springs Methodist Church. Demand for the free food offered at the pantry has almost doubled in the last month. (Photo by Megan Bachman)

    Patty McAllister is making sure that no one in Yellow Springs goes hungry. The Yellow Springs Community Food Pantry, which she coordinates, provides free food and household goods on a bi-weekly and emergency basis to local households in need.

  • Sustainable, affordable properties— Land trust for the long haul

    While legally, the property beneath Cathleen Tong’s home on Xenia Avenue is leased rather than owned, it feels to her like her own land.

  • Senior cycling champ retires at 77

    Richard Simons, shown above, recently retired at age 77 from competitive bicycle racing, in which he won many titles.

    “Whether you think you can do something or not, you’re probably right.” With this paraphrase of a quote from Henry Ford, 77-year-old champion cyclist Richard Simons sums up the attitude he credits with earning him scores of race victories and multiple world records.

  • Living green at Purple Moon Farm

    Sophie Entler and some of her hoofed friends at the Purple Moon Farm, which her parents, James Entler and Jessica Wyant, run on Meredith Road.

    On a recent afternoon, the sheep and goats at Purple Moon Farm are dozing in their pens. A hen wanders by, two middle-sized chicks close behind her; other chickens rest in the shade of the raspberry bushes planted in parallel rows.

  • Brady rejoins girls b-ball

    photo by Kelsey Cundiff

    The Yellow Springs High School girls basketball team has a new coach this year, but he is no stranger to coaching. This season will be Xenia native Clayton Brady’s 35th year coaching basketball. For the past two years Brady has coached the seventh-grade McKinney boys basketball team that the championship last year.

  • Bulldog Sports Round-up

    The Lady Bulldogs lost their season opener at Mechanicsburg by a score of 89–28 on Monday, Nov. 29. Alex Beer led Yellow Springs (0–1) with 12 points, four rebounds and two assists.

  • Frank Betcher

    A memorial service for Frank Betcher will be held on Wednesday, Dec. 29, at 2 p.m. in Rockford Chapel.

  • Crickets rescheduled

    A Crickets basketball makeup session, replacing the canceled third session, will be held Tuesday, Dec. 14, 4–5 p.m. at the Bryan Center. The remaining originally scheduled sessions will be held on Fridays, Dec. 3, 10 and 17, 6–7 p.m.

The forecast for 45387 by WP Wunderground