Arts Section :: Page 46

  • WYSO brings StoryCorps

    Three WYSO Public Radio employees greeted the StoryCorps mobile booth when it arrived in Dayton on Monday, April 19. Shown are Peter Hayes, director of operations, Julietta Fromholtz, Webmaster and Neenah Ellis, station manager. The StoryCorps mobile booth, which is being sponsored by WYSO, will be parked in front of the Schuster Center in downtown Dayton from April 22 to May 15, as part of a nationwide project to collect oral history.

    When Neenah Ellis was growing up in northern Indiana, she regularly listened to Studs Terkel interview guests on Chicago radio. The legendary oral historian became an inspiration and role model, according to Ellis, who is now general manager of WYSO Public Radio.

  • ‘Urinetown’ bursts with surprises

    If viewers who haven’t heard of Urinetown: The Musical think they know what the Broadway hit is about, they don’t. If those who have heard about the show but haven’t seen it think they know how it ends, they don’t.

  • YSHS opens ‘Urinetown: The Musical’ this weekend

    Central cast figures rehearsed last week, including Anne Weigand and Adam Zaremsky, front, as Hope Cladwell and Bobby Strong, and from left, Jacob Kintner as Caldwell Cladwell, Rory Papania Officer Barrel, Elliot Cromer as Officer Lockstock, and Lauren Westendorf as Little Sally.  (photo by Lauren Heaton)

    The Yellow Springs High School/McKinney School present Urinetown: The Musical. Click on the title for showtimes and a link to an audio slideshow with stills from rehearsals and interviews with the actors.

  • Tricksters skate to springtime tunes

    Colby Gulick, from Grove City, took a turn playing skate while other youth watched and waited for their time to shine. (photo by Lauren Heaton)

    About 100 people from the village and region showed up for music and tricking at Saturday’s Super Spectacular Extraordinarily Energized Skarstic Festival at the Yellow Springs Skate Park.

  • College welcomes dancers back

    This weekend’s Community Dance Concert, to take place at the Antioch College south gym, will feature a wide array of villagers, including those in the photo. In the back row, from left, are Curtis Bliss, holding his son, Braiden, Stefan Turner, Amanda Hamisch and Brendan Sheehan. In the second row, from left, are Kristen Foster and Elizabeth Lutz (seated on suitcases), Amelia Tarpey (behind suitcase), Helen Reed, Jade Turner, Lucas Mulhall, Savana Amos and Charlotte Walkey. In the front row are Arielle Johnson, Jennifer Johnson, Liam Lutz, Marta Mari-Crocker and Aidan Lutz. (photo by Diane Chiddister)

    After nearly a decade of success under the guidance of Valerie Blackwell-Truitt, the Yellow Springs Community Dance Concert has a new face — three new faces, to be exact.

  • Antioch College features Whitmore

    Saturday night’s opening reception of “Robert Whitmore: A Devoted Sense of Place” at the Antioch College Herndon Gallery. Shown are Kay Kendall with Sue Parker; in the background is Ali Thomas.

    Antioch College’s Herndon Gallery features a retrospective of Robert Whitmore’s oils and works on papers, with an emphasis on local landscapes.

  • Telling stories to save the land

    Eric Wolf remembers the moment he made an emotional commitment to supporting farmland preservation. He had returned to Shelter Island outside New York City, the place where as a child he went to hunt scallops and wonder at the expanse of cornfields.

  • In time for spring, an artistic blooming on Dayton Street

    JafaGirls Nancy Mellon and Corrine Bayraktaroglu

    “Flower power” will take on new meaning soon in Yellow Springs, as colorful blossoms spring to life on benches and poles on Dayton and Corry Streets, just in time for the greening of spring. It’s the latest project from Corrine Bayraktaroglu and Nancy Mellon, also known as the JafaGirls.

  • A magical red carpet ride

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    Walking down Xenia Avenue in early spring, particularly after such a tough February, is much kinder to the soul than driving through Los Angeles traffic, or walking a red carpet. We’re glad to be home from our Oscar adventure, grateful to our beloved hometown for all the support. We heard the Little Art was packed. Friends and neighbors have been asking what it was like. I’ll do my best to answer that question here.

  • Film shows role for prison art

    Local filmmaker Joanne Caputo interviewed her nephew, John Caputo, in the Pittsburgh barbershop he opened after he was released from the Graterford state penitentiary in Pennsylvania. Villagers are invited to attend a free screening of her 40-minute documentary “Cutting Loose” at the Little Art Theatre on Friday, March 19, at 5 p.m.

    As a filmmaker who has experienced some success and some challenges, Joanne Caputo has occasionally asked herself the question, “Am I an artist?” It’s perhaps a feeling she shares with her nephew, John Caputo, who is the focus of her latest documentary. As a prisoner for 11 years at the Graterford and Harrisburg penitentiaries in Pennsylvania, John Caputo would say that art in some ways saved him. But in making a life after his release, he wonders if he is truly an artist or simply an ex-con who makes art.

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