May
27
2016
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Saturday
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From The Print Section :: Page 56

  • Academy demystifies coding

    Network engineer Ishema Umuhoza worked with Collin and Nick Calfee at the Yellow Springs Coding Academy’s inaugural open house earlier this month. The programming school officially opens its doors at the Kettering Science building on East South College Street on Saturday, May 9. Register by calling 937-554-3883. (Photo by Lauren Heaton)

    Local computer whiz Ishema Umuhoza loves to play soccer and got seriously into bicycling to improve his overall fitness on the field.

  • Jim Smith memorial planned

    Obituary

    On Feb. 3, Jim Smith died at home after an extended battle with cancer.

  • Council stand on utilities is giving way

    THUMB_Print

    The unanimous stand taken by Village Council at its last meeting for holding property owners responsible for their tenants’ utility debts began crumbling at Monday’s meeting, when two Council members formerly for the policy change weighed in against it, and another expressed ambivalence.

  • April 30, 2015 Bulldog sports round-up

    Yellow Springs High School softball player Elly Kumbusky hit for the Lady Bulldogs on Thursday, April 23, against defending conference champions Dayton Christian. (Submitted photo)

    April 30, 2015 Bulldog sports round-up

  • Some note change in policing style

    THUMB_Print

    Late one evening last month, a local couple was celebrating their anniversary with friends at the Gulch.

  • Acting out

    This year’s Yellow Springs High School One Act plays, which include titles such as “Second Coming,” “Welcome to Hell” and “The Bliss.” The show opens this weekend at Mills Lawn gym, with performances on Friday and Saturday, April 24 and 25, 8 p.m. and Sunday, at 2 p.m. Admission is $5 at the door, with proceeds benefitting the high school drama program. (Photo by Lauren Heaton)

    The show opens this weekend at Mills Lawn gym, with performances on Friday and Saturday, April 24 and 25, 8 p.m. and Sunday, at 2 p.m. Admission is $5 at the door, with proceeds benefitting the high school drama program.

  • Clifton hosts Ohio Chautauqua — Tour brings life to voices from past

    Living history scholars will raise the voices of early American figures such as poet and naturalist Henry David Thoreau, Civil Rights preacher Martin Luther King Jr., and Titanic survivor Edith Russell, when the Village of Clifton hosts its first Ohio Chautauqua this summer from June 30 to July 4. The Chautauqua steering committee, which has spent the past year preparing for the event, includes from left, Village Council member Paula Lazorski, Steve McFarland, Arby Conn, Lemoine Rice, Mathew McNelly and Mayor Alex Bieri. (Photo by Lauren Heaton)

    J. Goldsborough Bruff was an adventurous artist and mapmaker who captained an expedition of 60 armed men, 14 wagons, and 70 mules across the continent during the 1849 California Gold Rush.

  • August Michael Knemeyer

    042315_august-knemeyer

    August Michael Knemeyer, 1946–2015, passed away March 31, under the loving care of his wife, Melva.

  • Mad undertaking

    In front, from left, Felix Buehrig as Alice is pulled down the rabbit hole by White Rabbit Galen Sieck while, in second row, Sarah Gansz, the Cheshire Cat, grins, March Hare Selah Griffin and Dormouse Lida Boutis look on and Samantha Snyder, also Alice, is greeting Tweedle Dee and Tweedle Dum, Zay Crawford and Timmy Bold. In back left, Ibi Chappelle, as Mad Hatter, is running late. (Photo by Megan Bachman)

    The Antioch School is staging “Alice in Wonderland” for its annual spring musical.

  • Women help women, quietly

    Founded in 1980, the Feminist Health Fund raises money from the community and disperses it to needy women suffering from a catastrophic illness. Current board members are, clockwise from front, Esther Hetzler, Kathy Robertson, Sue Parker, Janet Ward, Joyce Morrissey, Denise Cupps and Marianne Whelchel. Not pictured is Elizabeth Danowski. (Photo by Megan Bachman)

    When Moya Shea received an unexpected medical bill from a clinic a few years ago for a procedure she thought was covered by insurance, she was startled. Quite ill at the time, she turned to a local group for help.