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Jun
14
2024

Articles About native plants

  • New prairie to protect Ellis Pond

    On Thursday, Nov. 16, a small team of local residents and members of the Village Environmental Commission went to the northern reaches of the 17-acre Ellis Park to install a 4,500-square-foot prairie.

  • 2023 Earth Day Celebration

    On Sunday, April 23, around 100 villagers and visitors gathered at the John Bryan Community Center to celebrate Earth Day.

  • Yellow Springs Habitat Community and Earth Day celebration set

    The annual Yellow Springs Habitat Community and Earth Day celebration will be Sunday, April 23, 1:30–4:30 p.m., at the John Bryan Community Center.

  • Garden gait

    Amid intermittent torrents of rain, and while the power was out throughout the entire village for several hours, the Yellow Springs Garden Tour took place on Sunday, July 17.

  • Village Council — Weeds are out, ‘managed’ yards are in

    Villagers who are maintaining a natural landscape of native grasses and plants in their yard no longer have to comply with height limits on their plantings.However, those who simply “let their yards go” must pull the noxious weeds likely growing there and keep grasses to nine inches, or less.

  • Down to earth

    On Sunday, April 25, the villagewide Earth Week series of events came to a celebratory crescendo at the new Miami Township Fire-Rescue firehouse on the south end of town.

  • Creating wildlife habitat, villagewide

    In late summer, native sunflowers in Ellen Hoover’s garden draw goldfinches. The bright yellow birds feast on seeds, then burst out like sunflower petals flung to the sky. Down the street, monarch butterflies browse Catherine Zimmerman’s coneflowers, goldenrod and asters.

  • Invasive of the month— Tree-of-heaven’s devilish dispersal

    Brought to this country in the 1700s as a horticultural specimen and shade tree, tree-of-heaven is one of North America’s most invasive tree species.

  • ‘Green death’ and other invasives

    Bradford pear trees, an invasive decorative tree which had been planted downtown, have gradually been replaced by American hornbeam, American yellowwood, Greenspire linden and Princeton elm, all native species. (Photo by Audrey Hackett)

    Drew Diehl calls it “the Green Death.” Pervasive in many areas, a single non-native species of honeysuckle — Amur honeysuckle — has transformed the local landscape over the last 30 years.

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