Village Automotive
Jul
18
2019
Yellow Springs
76°
broken clouds
humidity: 78%
wind: 7mph SSW
H 80 • L 76

Articles About why YS?

  • Happy to be home again

    Zo Van Eaton Meister and Dave Meister moved to Yellow Springs in 2009. For Zo, it was a homecoming to a village she’d been connected to since she was a child. The whole family is pictured in front of their Fair Acres home: from left, Sven, Kate, Zo, Dave, Jane and Nicholas. (Photo by Audrey Hackett)

    When people ask Zo Van Eaton Meister if she grew up in Yellow Springs, she usually replies, “Sort of.” The story of her connection to the village is complicated.

  • They’re villagers, thanks to Google

    Dorothy Dean and Jarod Rogers moved to Yellow Springs in July of 2015, seeking to be closer to Rogers’ eight-year-old daughters, who live with their mother in Columbus. The couple are enjoying the trees and casual feeling in the neighborhood of their new home, where they relaxed with their dogs Sita and Dicey on a recent weekend. (Photo by Audrey Hackett)

    A simple Google search brought Dorothy Dean and Jarod Rogers to Yellow Springs. “I literally Googled, ‘What is the most liberal town in Ohio?’” Dean recalled, laughing, in a recent interview.

  • Village a great place to raise children

    Bob and Olga Harris live in the same Miami Drive home they purchased (for $24,500) almost 50 years ago. They found Yellow Springs an excellent place to raise their three children, whose photos, along with those of their three grandchildren, are proudly displayed in their home. (Photo by Diane Chiddister)

    In the late 1960s when Robert and Olga Harris moved to the village, racial segregation and prejudice was a reality in most cities and towns. But in Yellow Springs, they found a place where their children were free to be who they wanted to be without the burden of racial prejudice.

  • ‘Nomads’ decide to settle down in Village

    Villagers Tanya Maus and James Luckett romped with their son, August Frederick Townes, at the Mills Lawn playground on a recent evening. Maus and Luckett moved to Yellow Springs in 2013, and August was born six months later. This summer, the family put down permanent roots, buying a home through Home, Inc. (Photo by Audrey Hackett)

    An artist and an academic move to Yellow Springs. They find people, jobs, a community they enjoy. They have a child. In a few years, they buy a house. They make plans for their little boy’s future. In short, they settle down.

  • Choosing a college and a town

    Lori Collins-Hall and Chris Burgher are shown here with their dog, Snickers, in the backyard of their Gardendale Drive home. The two moved to Yellow Springs two years ago from upstate New York after Collins-Hall was offered the job of vice president of academic affairs at Antioch College, where she is now provost. (Photo by Diane Chiddister)

    When Lori Collins-Hall and Chris Burgher first visited Yellow Springs two years ago, they were checking out the village as a place to live.

  • Living, learning in the real world

    Alexandra Scott, known in Yellow Springs as Alex, posed outside the Spirited Goat on a recent afternoon. The Dayton Street coffeehouse is one of her favorite village haunts. A poet, activist and events coordinator extraordinaire, Scott moved here in 2012 and has gradually made the village her home. (Photo by audrey Hackett)

    Meet Alexandra Scott: event planner, poet, activist, coffeehouse lover, future entrepreneur, villager.

  • From ‘the last frontier’ to Ohio

    The Oberg family, from left, Eric, Cole, Kelley and Sage (plus 17-year-old dog, Larsen), moved to Yellow Springs in 2014 seeking an open and tolerant community. Intrepid adventurers, Eric, born and raised in Alaska, and Kelley, who lived there for many years, are “homesteading” on a small scale at their Fair Acres residence, including by planting the gardens pictured here. (Photo by Audrey Hackett)

    Before moving to Yellow Springs, Eric and Kelley Oberg had never owned a home with a doorbell.

  • At 83, she’s no longer invisible

    Two years ago Joan Champie left her home of 30 years in Texas and moved to Yellow Springs, knowing only one person in the village. She says she’s glad she made the move. (Photo by Diane Chiddister)

    For her 60th birthday, Joan Champie jumped out of a plane. “I grinned all the way down,” she said of her first tandem parachute jump.

  • Making a good life in Yellow Springs

    Cory and Amanda Howard, with Townes, a Walker Coonhound they rescued, enjoyed a recent sunny Saturday afternoon on their Cliff Street porch. The couple moved to the village over four years ago. With a rental they love, jobs in the area and their first child on the way, the couple is putting down roots in Yellow Springs. (Photo by Audrey Hackett)

    Walk by a certain Cliff Street porch on a spring or summer evening, and Cory and Amanda Howard will likely be out in the cooling air.

  • Artist family makes it work in Yellow Springs

    Artist Anna Burke and musician Ryan Stinson, with their daughter, Presley, 18 months, on a recent evening at the laundromat on Dayton Street. Burke and Stinson each moved to Yellow Springs in 2012 from nearby communities. They met here and have begun to build a life in the village, loving the community and navigating the challenges of housing, employment, parenthood and pursuing their art. (Photo by Dylan Taylor-Lehman)

    Anna Burke, her husband, Ryan Stinson, and their daughter, Presley, are a young family whose appreciation for Yellow Springs has evolved over their four years in the village.