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Mar
30
2020

Media Section :: Page 7

  • Film tonight on civil rights murders

    A documentary on the effects of the 40-year-old murders of three civil rights workers on a Mississippi town will be shown Thursday, Sept. 23, at the Little Art Theater in Yellow Springs.

  • Mickunas returns to WYSO

    Vick Mickunas and his popular show “Book Nook” will return to WYSO Public Radio this Friday, Sept. 17, at 1:30 p.m.

  • Looking at Yellow Springs through our elders’ eyes

    In 1999 local filmmaker Patti Dallas produced “A Portrait of Yellow Springs Through the Eyes of Our Elders,” a documentary for which she interviewed 17 individuals aged 75 and older. The elders spoke to themes such as the village’s early history, local resources such as Glen Helen and Antioch College, and the landmarks of Yellow Springs.

  • WYSO cleans up at AP awards

    Local public radio station WYSO racked up ten awards, more than any other public radio station in the state, at the Ohio Associated Press Broadcasters 2010 luncheon in Columbus on Sunday, June 6.

  • Local filmmakers to screen works at FilmDayton Festival

    More than 20 years ago Jennifer Sharp worked as a janitor at the Little Art Theatre, cleaning the bathrooms and sweeping up popcorn. The 36-year-old is now back as a successful film director to show her first full-length feature.

  • WYSO brings StoryCorps

    When Neenah Ellis was growing up in northern Indiana, she regularly listened to Studs Terkel interview guests on Chicago radio. The legendary oral historian became an inspiration and role model, according to Ellis, who is now general manager of WYSO Public Radio.

  • A magical red carpet ride

    Walking down Xenia Avenue in early spring, particularly after such a tough February, is much kinder to the soul than driving through Los Angeles traffic, or walking a red carpet. We’re glad to be home from our Oscar adventure, grateful to our beloved hometown for all the support. We heard the Little Art was packed. Friends and neighbors have been asking what it was like. I’ll do my best to answer that question here.

  • Film shows role for prison art

    As a filmmaker who has experienced some success and some challenges, Joanne Caputo has occasionally asked herself the question, “Am I an artist?” It’s perhaps a feeling she shares with her nephew, John Caputo, who is the focus of her latest documentary. As a prisoner for 11 years at the Graterford and Harrisburg penitentiaries in Pennsylvania, John Caputo would say that art in some ways saved him. But in making a life after his release, he wonders if he is truly an artist or simply an ex-con who makes art.

  • ‘The Last Truck’ is Oscar-bound

    Steve Bognar and Julia Reichert, the village’s most famous filmmakers, will become even more famous next month when they attend the Oscar awards ceremony in Los Angeles as directors of one of the five films nominated in the Best Documentary Short category.

  • Red carpet for film biz partners

    There are many differences in the lives of good friends Diana Scott and Donna Lynn Johnson. A practicing nurse as well as the owner of Scott Street Tavern in Springfield, Scott is also a film student at Wright State University and the mother of two children. Johnson has a teenage son and is the owner of the Main Squeeze on Xenia Avenue. In her spare time, she runs a food consulting company and previously held positions with companies like Dole and Safeway Manufacturing in her native California.

    There is, however, something that is bringing these two seemingly divergent lives together: a joint venture that they have named Mad River Films.