Articles by Lauren Heaton :: Page 69

  • Clinic leaves town for now

    The Wright State physicians who operate the Yellow Springs Family Health Center at the corner of Xenia Avenue and Herman Street are temporarily relocating to Greene Memorial Hospital in Xenia at the end of next month. According to health center Medical Director Cynthia Olsen, she hopes to unyoke the practice from a rapidly deteriorating facility and raise funds for a smaller, more efficient building in the same location as the original.

  • Local offices up for election in fall

    The excitement of last year’s presidential election should only serve to underscore the importance of the local elections that are scheduled at the end of this year. On Nov. 10, 2009, three Village Council seats, Village mayor, three seats for Yellow Springs Board of Education and two seats for Miami Township Board of Trustees will be up for election.

  • FCC senior apartments put on hold

    The senior apartment building that Friends Care Community plans to build downtown has been delayed due to financing issues, Friends Care Director Karl Zalar said last week. Friends had hoped to break ground this spring on the project at the corner of Xenia Avenue and Limestone Street.

  • Alternative vet clinic is approved

    An alternative veterinary office will soon be a new business on the corner of Stafford and Union Streets, after Village Planning Commission approved at its Monday, June 8 meeting a proposal to turn an unoccupied house into a small clinic.

  • Tasers: effective or too easy?

    Since the Yellow Springs Police Department began arming its officers with Tasers in August 2008, the stun guns have been deployed seldom and according to departmental policy, Police Chief John Grote said in a recent interview.

  • The ‘News’ off the page, on the stage

    Mad River Theater will present Off the Press, an original play about the role of the Yellow Springs News in the village, from June 5–7 at the First Presbyterian Church. Featured are, clockwise from left, Rick Walkey, Doug Hinkley, Flo Lorenz, Howard Shook, Ali Thomas and Charlotte Walkey. At the table is Lucas Hudson-Groves.

    In the text of the classified ad about a lost puppy, there is a bigger story. In the letter to the editor about a neighbor’s farm that should or shouldn’t be developed, there is a bigger story. In the sports section about a ragamuffin team that clawed its way to state, there is still a bigger story.

  • Glismann searches elsewhere

    Yellow Springs Schools Superintendent Norman Glismann was named one of five finalists for the position of superintendent of Mechanicsburg Exempted Village School District last week, according to a Springfield News-Sun article from Tuesday, May 12. This is the second superintendent position that Glismann, who just finished the second year of a three-year contract with Yellow Springs schools, has applied for this year.

  • YSHS 2009 valedictorian, salutatorian—Village nurtured YSHS scholars

    Growing up in Yellow Springs was easy and carefree, Olivia Chen said this week. Not having to worry about others labeling her or questioning her identity, she was able to focus on things that were more important and more fun, such as playing tennis, performing theater and developing a deep sense of curiosity about the natural sciences and cultural diversity.

  • A decade of service—Home, Inc. builds diversity, stability

    Yellow Springs native Tawn Jackson Singh moved into her first home in Yellow Springs with her husband Jai Singh in November 2008, thanks to support from Home, Inc. Tawn is a new member of the Home, Inc. board, which marks its 10th anniversary this year.

    In terms of social memory, Yellow Springs has much to draw from recent history, including the coming together for Antioch College’s revival, the public effort to save Whitehall Farm, and the effort to prevent sprawl from developing on the west edge of town. A social memory of common experiences and struggles creates the kind of community that can weather political storms, according to local resident Don Hollister, and that is the kind of community he wants to support.

  • Glen Helen celebrates 80 years as a living green memorial

    Glen Helen Director Nick Boutis and 12 local birders saw and heard a phoebe, a yellow rumped warbler, a screech owl and what they guessed was a Cooper’s hawk soaring high above the trees on Sunday morning. The bird hike was a preview to the annual bird counting event, Make It Count for the Birds, to be held on Saturday, May 9, during the month the Glen will celebrate its 80th birthday.

    Morning may be considered a quiet time for humans, but for birds it’s all about chatting. Male red-winged blackbirds call to their drably dressed counterparts, downy woodpeckers impound their beaks for breakfast nibbles, and goldfinch streak through cedars in their chase as cardinals try to drown them all out with unsubtle piercing refrains.

  • Farmers corner new market

    Can there ever be too much locally grown, fresh fruit and vegetables in one town? Vendors at a new Yellow Springs farmers’ market think not, and they aim to give shoppers more variety by opening in the Corner Cone parking lot on Saturdays, just down the street from the farmers’ market at Kings Yard. Both markets open on May 2 and will continue Saturday mornings from 7 to 11:30 a.m. through the summer.

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