Village Life Section :: Page 32

  • BLOG—this year in Yellow Springs

    A Passover Seder Plate showing (clockwise, from top): Maror and chazeret — Bitter herbs, symbolizing the bitterness of slavery which the Hebrews endured in Egypt; Z'roa - A roasted lamb or goat shankbone, symbolising the Passover sacrifice; vegetarians often substitute a beet; Charoset — Apple, nut and honey paste representing the mortar used by the Jewish slaves to build the storehouses; Karpas — A vegetable which is dipped into salt water representing tears shed by Hebrew slaves; Beitzah — A hard-boiled egg, symbolizing the festival sacrifice and roasted and eaten as part of the Seder meal. Some Seder plates also include an orange to represent those considered out of place in more conservative Jewish teachings. (Photo from Wikipedia)

    The room of 20-some people, seated around a festively decorated table, falls to a hush as the voice of a 6-year old, reading, asks, “why is this night different from all other nights?”

  • Yellow Springs Buffet to close

    The Yellow Springs Buffet and Diner will close at the end of the day today, April 13, after almost six months of business, due to disappointing sales, according to owner Don Bowling. Villagers can still eat at the restaurant's $5 buffet during business hours today.

    The Yellow Springs Buffet and Diner will close at the end of the day today, April 13, due to disappointing business.

  • Canadian David Suzuki speaks after film— Environmental icon comes to YS

    Canadian environmentalist Dr. David Suzuki will speak at the Little Art Theatre in Yellow Springs following the screening of his autobiographical film, Force of Nature, at 7 p.m. on Sunday, April 15. (Submitted photo)

    If you had one last lecture to give, what would you say? In the film Force of Nature, Dr. David Suzuki, known as the godfather of the environmental movement in Canada, delivers a legacy lecture indicting humanity for undermining the planet’s life support systems.

  • Water pollution we all create— Catching up with runaway runoff

    There is a gully in the Glen at the northeast edge of the village, not far from the Glen Helen Building. When it rains, water comes rushing into the Glen, carrying with it the runoff from the village, its street oils, its lawn chemicals, and its trash.

  • Funderburg Farm— Asking horses to trust people

    Laura Funderburg uses the natural horsemanship technique when she trains and teaches at her family’s farm on the southern edge of the village. (Photo by Lauren Heaton)

    At the place where east Hyde Road ends and unspoiled farmland begins, Pat Funderburg has his own practice of asking, not telling, and working with instead of against, the horses on his family’s farm.

  • Politics divide local Catholics

    Recently, some parishioners have made public their distress that St. Paul Catholic Church has become more politically conservative and at the same time less welcoming to Yellow Springs residents.

  • Toxic sites are under control

    Over the past two decades, Vernay, along with Morris Bean & Company, YSI, Inc. and the Village Water Reclamation plant, have all been point sources of pollution to local ground and surface water. But through their efforts and work with the U.S. and Ohio Environmental Protection Agencies, all four point sources of area water pollution have made strides to control and mitigate the damage they caused to the local watershed.

  • Interim chief comes out of retirement

    Former Beavercreek Police Chief Art Scott has come out of retirement (for the second time) to take the position of interim Yellow Springs police chief, following the retirement last week of John Grote. Scott anticipates that his interim position will last three to six months, and he has not yet decided whether to apply for the permanent position. (Photo by Diane Chiddister)

    Former Beavercreek Police Chief Arthur Scott is the Yellow Springs Interim Police Chief, taking the place of John Grote, who retired last week.

  • Bender honored for WWII service

    Villager Jonas Bender will be honored soon for his World War II military service, when he was part of the first group of African Americans to join the Marines. Called the Montford Point Marines, the group was subjected to racism and segregation while in the military. The group will receive the Congressional Gold Medal this spring for its contributions to the war effort. (Photo by Diane Chiddister)

    As a boy growing up in Mississippi, Jonas Bender knew about racism and segregation. But living in “the oasis of integration” that was the college town of Tougaloo, Bender knew about racism mainly from other people’s stories.

  • Spring has officially, and very quickly, arrived

    The bees were swarming a flowering tree in front of the Yellow Springs train station Wednesday. (Photo by Megan Bachman)

    Spring has sprung three to four weeks early this year, as evidenced by the billowy white pear trees downtown, which most often bloom in mid April.

Weather forecast by WP Wunderground & Denver Snow Service