Nov
17
2018
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Articles by Diane Chiddister

More Articles by Diane Chiddister
  • The Great War that transformed the village

    This 1918 photo shows some of the Antioch College students who joined the Student’s Army Training Corps, a federal program in which male college students were given military training while taking college courses. To be part of the national World War I program, the college had to turn a dormitory into a military barracks. Fifty-four students took part in the training, which included marching around campus in formation. (photo courtesy of Scott Sanders, Antiochiana, Antioch College)

    On Feb. 14, 1919, the Yellow Springs News published a long list on its front page, spanning the entire length of the paper. It was the “Roll of Honor,” a list of all villagers who had served, or were serving, in the Army during the First World War, which had recently ended.

  • A good year for new Friends Care director

    Mike Montgomery has been director of the Friends Care Community for almost a year, having begun in early December 2017. Since beginning the job, he's most proud of making some changes that contributed to raising staff morale, and adding new staff. (Photo by Diane Chiddister)

    While Mike Montgomery is the executive director of Friends Care Community, he takes a modest position regarding how critical he is to the functioning of the local continuing care center.

  • Senior rentals move forward

    Home, Inc. leaders recently presented plans and designs for their proposed 54-unit senior affordable rental housing project, to be located between East Marshall and East Herman streets and across from Friends Care Community. If funding comes through for the project, those 55 and older whose income is up to 60 percent of area median income, or about $27,000 for a single person, will be eligible to rent an apartment. (Rendering courtesy of Home, Inc.)

    A significant senior affordable rental project more than 10 years in the making is moving forward, according to Home, Inc. leaders at a recent community meeting.

  • Sanctuary explored as ICE activity increases

    Edith Espinal, an undocumented Mexican-born woman who has lived in the Columbus area for decades, is shown here being welcomed by the Columbus Mennonite Church, which for the last year has provided her sanctuary to protect her from deportation. Pastor Joel Miller, pastor of the Columbus church, will speak this Saturday, Oct. 20, at 7 p.m., at Rockford Chapel, of his church’s experience in offering sanctuary. (Submitted photo)

    When friends of Dayton attorney Kathleen Kersh express their outrage at the Trump administration’s practice of separating immigrant families at the U.S./Mexican border, Kersh reminds them: the very same activity is taking place in Ohio, and at an ever-increasing rate.

  • Emily Foubert’s Nature Connect — Kids plus nature equals wonder

    At a recent Forest Family session of the Nature Connect outdoor school, Emily Foubert looked closely at a puffball mushroom with Zander Breza, who had spotted the mushroom. Looking on are Meredith Carpe and daughter Havah, age 2. The program, Mondays from 9 to 10:30 a.m., is open to children 5 and under with an adult. Foubert, who grew up in Yellow Springs, is fulfilling her dream of opening up an outdoor school for children. Tuesday sessions for home-schooled children are also offered. (Photo by Diane Chiddister)

    In this, its pilot season, Emily Foubert’s Nature Connect outdoor school offers two weekly sessions through November: the Forest Family program and a Homeschool program. Both programs have openings.

  • Wright State shuts down Fels study

    An unidentified Fels Longitudinal Study doctor is shown here circa the 1950s examining a young participant. The longest and largest longitudinal health study in the world, the Fels study, for many years based in Yellow Springs, still has more than 1,000 participants in the area, who had yearly appointments beginning in childhood to gather information on body composition. Last month Wright State closed down data collection for the Fels study, which would have turned 90 next year. (Photo courtesy of Antiochiana, Antioch College)

    The Fels Longitudinal Study, the world’s longest and largest longitudinal human growth study, has recently come to a close due to actions by Wright State University, which for decades has housed the study.

  • Soybean, corn farmers challenged by price drops

    Several local farmers cited Chinese tariffs on soybeans and an anticipated robust harvest as factors contributing to significantly lower prices for local crops, which spell diminished profits for farmers. (Photo by Diane Chiddister)

    While they differ in their assessment of causes, several local farmers agree on their current situation: it’s a challenging time to be a farmer in Ohio.

  • In September, a focus on dementia

    The 18-month-long Dementia Friendly Yellow Springs project is organizing several activities for September, World Alzheimer’s Month. Two of its organizers are, from left, Toni Dosik, and Karen Wolford of the Yellow Springs Senior Center. Not pictured are organizers Kate LeVesconte and Karen Puterbaugh of the Greene County Council on Aging. (Photo by Megan Bachman)

    When organizers for the Dementia Friendly Yellow Springs, or DFYS, project held a community book read last winter on a book about dementia, they were encouraged by the hardy response.

  • Five years on, shooting death has profound ripples

    More than 100 villagers attended a candlelight vigil the night after the July 31, 2013, death of Paul E. Schenck, who was killed by a sheriff sniper following a four-hour standoff with more than 80 police officers at Schenck’s High Street home. The event, which disturbed many villagers, has led to significant changes in local policing. (News archive photo)

    When Kate Hamilton moved back to her hometown of Yellow Springs six years ago, she had no desire to reform local policing.

  • Follow the music from porch to porch

    Brittany Baum, left, and Rachel Price, shown here on Baum’s backyard deck, are co-organizers of the first Yellow Springs Porchfest, to take place Saturday, Oct. 6, from noon to 7 p.m. At the event, local musicians will play for free on villagers’ porches, decks and yards. (Photo by Diane Chiddister)

    Villagers coming together to hear local musicians. Neighbors greeting those they know and welcoming those they haven’t met before. People enjoying a beautiful autumn day outdoors, walking the neighborhoods of the village.