Nov
17
2019
Yellow Springs
47°
clear sky
humidity: 49%
wind: 5mph SSW
H 53 • L 44

Articles by Diane Chiddister

More Articles by Diane Chiddister
  • Dementia friendly project ends, but effort continues

    At last Friday’s wrap-up breakfast for Dementia Friendly Yellow Springs, Gilah Pomeranz spoke on the project’s positive effects on downtown businesses. About 50 people attended the event, which brought the 18-month project, sponsored by the Yellow Springs Senior Center, to an end. (Photo by Diane Chiddister)

    During the year-and-a-half duration of the Dementia Friendly Yellow Springs project, organizers were most surprised by the number of people who approached them to say they personally had a connection to the disease.

  • Bringing mindfulness to prison

    Katie Egart of the Yellow Springs Dharma Center is shown here, top center, with a Marysville prison inmate who presented her, along with Dharma Center members Donna Denman and MJ Gentile, with an original painting of the center in appreciation for the meditation group that Egart leads there. Egart, a Buddhist priest, travels to Marysville and to the Dayton Correctional Institute two times a month to hold a meditation session for interested inmates. (Submitted photo)

    Whenever Katie Egart walks into the Dayton Correctional Institution, or DCI, she encounters locked doors.

  • Chili cook-off hits 25th year

    The 25th Annual McKinney Chili Cook-off takes place Saturday, April 6.

  • Alyce Earl Jenkins— Recognized for service, teaching

    Alyce Earl Jenkins is shown in her Omar Circle home. She has been widely recognized for her work of rehabilitation counseling at Wright State University. (Photo by Diane Chiddister)

    “Sometimes when I’m feeling down, I come in here and think, well, I did make a contribution to different communities at different times,” Alyce Earl Jenkins said in an interview last week. That’s quite an understatement.

  • Hearing officer conclusion—Meister violated no policies

    In a decision released Wednesday, Feb. 20, pre-disciplinary hearing officer Jeffrey Hazlett concluded that Yellow Springs Police Officer Dave Meister did not violate any police department policies by not responding to a shooting in the village in early December. 

  • A life serving Scouts, village

    Villager Frances Smith has been honored for her longtime association with the Girl Scouts. She has also donated countless hours to local volunteer projects, including helping to launch the Yellow Springs Community Children’s Center and assisting the YSHS art department in upgrading its video program. (Submitted photo)

    When Frances Smith was a child in Meridian, Miss., her mother pushed hard to start a Girl Scout troop for black girls. While there was no chance that the girls would be integrated into existing groups of white Girl Scouts, at the time there was not even a separate group for black girls. But Smith’s mother was determined to give her daughter the same opportunities her older brothers had, when they belonged to a Boy Scout troop for African-American boys.

  • Filmmakers win Sundance honor

    Steve Bognar and Julia Reichart are shown in Park City, Utah, where they last week attended the prestigious Sundance Film Festival to show their documentary, “American Factory.” The filmmakers brought home one of the festival’s top honors, the “Directing Award: U.S. Documentary.” (Submitted photo)

    Yellow Springs filmmakers Julia Reichert and Steve Bognar brought home one of the highest honors from the Sundance Film Festival last week. The couple received the “Directing Award: U.S. Documentary” for “American Factory,” their feature-length documentary, at Sundance, the most prestigious American film festival.

  • Former villager pens children’s books

    Author and former Yellow Springs resident Fred Rexroad wrote the Whiz Tanner mystery series for kids, which is set in the very Yellow Springs-like fictional town of Jasper Springs. (Submitted photo)

    Jasper Springs, the imaginary setting for Fred Rexroad’s mystery book series for children, looks a lot like Yellow Springs.

  • Antioch College steps up diversity, inclusion

    The reality of a relatively robust percentage of students from diverse backgrounds living together on a small campus can make for a uniquely challenging college experience, according to Antioch leaders. And those leaders, including faculty, staff and students, are aiming to help students address those challenges.

  • Village filmmaker is honored by industry

    Founding members of the New Day Film cooperative, a group founded by Julia Reichert and Jim Klein for the self-distribution of films, are, from left top, Amalie Rothschild, Reichert, Klein, Joyce Chopra and Claudia Weil; and bottom, Liane Brandon. (submitted photo)

    Each year the International Documentary Association, a professional group for documentary filmmakers, selects a filmmaker to receive its highest honor, the Career Achievement Award.