Visual Arts Section :: Page 6

  • A red carpet affair

    The Little Art Theatre hosted an Oscar Night party last Sunday evening as a fundraiser for the non-profit.

  • A Strong passion for the letterpress

    Artist Sarah Strong is shown with the letterpress in her village studio.

    The letterpress in Sarah Strong’s studio, a sleek machine with levers and rollers fitted into a corner along the western wall, stands out.

  • Bahnsen’s photos to be honored

    An open house to honor a newly published book of photographs by Axel Bahnsen, a world renowned photographer who lived and worked in Yellow Springs for 50 years, will take place this Sunday, Sept. 19, at 2 p.m. at the Senior Center. The book was designed by Jane Baker and edited by Paul Cooper. Shown above is a self-portrait of Bahnsen. (photo by Alex Bahnsen)

    For more than 50 years until his death, a photographer of international stature lived and worked in Yellow Springs. The work of that photographer, Axel Bahnsen, will be honored this weekend with the publication of a new book of his photographs.

  • Art exhibit kicks off Glen 50th celebration

    Bill Hooper and Jane Baker were among the many villagers who attended the Friday night reception for the art exhibit that features artwork inspired by the Glen. They are looking at "Glen Helen Raptor" by local sculptor Jon Hudson, created from scrap metal found in the Glen. (Photo by Diane Chiddister)

    A well-attended exhibit of original art created by artists inspired by the Glen kicked off the Glen’s weekend celebration of its 50th anniversary on Friday evening.

  • Sculptor inspired by clay, politics

    Local sculptor Alice Robrish is shown in her Dayton Street studio, where she’s working on a series of busts of Afghan schoolgirls.

    The building on Dayton Street looks like an unassuming garage, set well back from the street. Look closely, though, and you might notice the tables and shelves inside. This is in fact an artist’s studio, converted from a garage to a work space by local sculptor Alice Robrish.

  • An ancient art lives on in YS

    Michel Zurbuchen is shown carving in his studio, Sculptor’s Emporium, which is located in Millworks. Zurbuchen offers classes to those interested in learning the art of stone carving, which he says is not that difficult. (Photo by Sehvilla Mann)

    At his booth at the June Street Fair, Michel Zurbuchen sets out two benches with a stone at each, plus tools and safety glasses, and encourages all who are interested to try carving for themselves. People who had never considered taking a hammer and chisel to rock find they don’t want to stop.

  • Antioch College features Whitmore

    Saturday night’s opening reception of “Robert Whitmore: A Devoted Sense of Place” at the Antioch College Herndon Gallery. Shown are Kay Kendall with Sue Parker; in the background is Ali Thomas.

    Antioch College’s Herndon Gallery features a retrospective of Robert Whitmore’s oils and works on papers, with an emphasis on local landscapes.

  • Worth about 1170 words

    Longtime villager Katherine Kadish is being honored by the Dayton Art Institute with an exhibit, “Katherine Kadish: Seasons,” that runs through April. The exhibit, in the museum’s north and south galleries, features paintings and monotypes from Kadish’s award-winning career. Read the story on page 7 of this week's issue.

    Copies of this and other photographs may be purchased from the News; please contact us via e-mail at ysnews {at} ysnews(.)com, or by phone, between 9:30 a.m. and 5: 30 p.m., Mon.–Fri. RELATED POSTS: Antioch art faculty exhibit edgy work at Herndon Ancient art forms a stone’s throw away Emporium to feature protester portraits

  • Outdoor sculpture contest winners — Public art to go public in October

    Local artists Beth Holyoke and Migiwa Orimo (shown sitting along the bike path on the newest tiled bench by Holyoke and local artist Kaethi Seidl) are two of the three winners of the recent Yellow Springs Outdoor Sculpture competition, sponsored by the Yellow Springs Arts Council, the Yellow Springs Center for the Arts Steering Committee and the Community Information Project. The third winner is Olga Ziemska of Cleveland. By the Fall Street Fair, public artwork by all three artists will be on display around the village.

    Most art is meant to be viewed by the public, but not all art takes up permanent residence in the public sphere in the way the three pieces that won the village’s first public sculpture contest are about to do. But come Street Fair time in early October, three public spaces in the village will display Beth Holyoke’s three-dimensional yellow mosaic of the word “springs,” Olga Ziemska’s sculpture of the hands of villagers cast in white in the image of a bird in flight, and Migiwa Orimo’s old-style telephone booth that beckons villagers to come inside and create their own experimental artworks.

  • Loading dock brings sculptor to YS

    Woodworker, sculptor and architectural designer Tom Hawley works on a sculptural bowl in his workspace at Millworks Business Center. Hawley’s work is on display at The Cannery Art and Design Center in Dayton and the Malton Gallery in Cincinnati.

    Massive logs lay outside the artist’s workspace, quietly waiting their turn to be carved, chiseled, shaped, shaved, sanded, planed and polished into a gallery of finely finished forms. The logs were recently recovered from a fallen Catalpa tree on the grounds of the Westcott House in Springfield, a unique example of the prairie-style architecture made famous by Frank Lloyd Wright.

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