Village Life Section :: Page 61

  • Do housing costs affect diversity?

    If local diversity can be measured by the number of African Americans who live within the geographical boundaries of Yellow Springs, the village has experienced three decades of decreasing diversity, and is likely wrapping up a fourth. Since 1970, the village has lost about 500 African-American residents, mirroring a larger regional trend.

  • Here comes the sun

    Here comes the sun

    Lauren Sheets danced as Scott Lee of Kettering played and sang outside Brother Bear’s.

  • Diversity decline linked to fewer jobs

    If Yellow Springs has lost a significant number of jobs in the past 15 years, it follows that villagers have lost employment opportunities, which has a visible effect on an already minority African-American population. There are fewer African Americans employed in the village now than there were 30 years ago, and though there have never been a lot of African Americans who own and operate businesses in town, the current number appears to be lower than ever.

  • Green space funds go to Jacoby farm preservation

    At their March 1 meeting, members of Yellow Springs Village Council unanimously approved contributing to the preservation of two farm properties, one of which includes the headwaters of the Jacoby Creek and is the first farm preserved within the Jacoby greenbelt.

  • Village youth say race is still an issue

    Yellow Springs can be a supportive town for black youth to grow up in, according to a group of 10 current Yellow Springs High School students and recent graduates in recent interviews. But the village is not immune to the issues that tend to divide the community by color and burden some African-American families disproportionately. Instances of discrimination are very subtle, and can be unintentional, but they do occur here, the youth said, and they pose obstacles both of perception and in actual practice that young people of color are challenged to overcome.

  • Achievement gap complex, but true

    When Joyce McCurdy accepted a teaching position in the Yellow Springs School District, there was a black chief of police, a black member of Council, and a black member of school board. The principal of the high school was black, and three of McCurdy’s colleagues were also black — and actively involved in the social issues of the day. The year was 1965.

  • Bye-bye-athlon

    Robert Hasek got his wintertime thrills, making his way home in the dusky hours over a fresh blanket of snow through Beatty Hughes Park last week, which his daughter, Olivia, almost 3, tolerated heroically.

    Robert Hasek got his wintertime thrills, making his way home in the dusky hours over a fresh blanket of snow.

  • Wright’s lifelong love for Japanese poetry across the ages

    Harold Wright has what is sometimes referred to as a “hard head.” The stubbornness of this 79-year-old retired college professor has been one of few consistencies in a life that has taken him to places as distant as Hawaii, Tokyo and New York City.

  • Diversity gap creates social divide

    When Isabel Newman graduated from Bryan High School in 1943, Antioch Bookplate President Ernest Morgan hired her to work for the company. Soon after, he sent her to a six-week course at the Mergenthaler linotype school in New York, and upon her return, she worked for the company for over 40 years, retiring as a manager. At that company, whose president actively promoted racial integration, she recalled that typically a fourth of the employees were minorities. The support for a racially diverse staff appeared to be the same at Vernay Laboratories, where two of Newman’s sisters worked, Yellow Springs Instruments and Antioch College, the place that bred all three companies and their socially minded leaders.

  • Shovelin’ in a winter wonderland

    021110_snow

    Late on Saturday morning, Francisco Cronin and Casey Grisco showed some metal by putting in a hard morning’s shovel.

The forecast for 45387 by WP Wunderground