Village Life Section :: Page 69

  • Parents start local Montessori

    Chaos reigned on a recent Wednesday in the Bryan Center gym, where a toddler play group meets each week. Balls were flying and kids caromed off of each other as mothers stood by watchfully. Then a box of curious looking toys were spread out, and one by one, the children came to sit on their mats and check out the shapes, colors and moving parts of the materials before them. The children were rapt, and according to Nacim Sajabi, they were learning in the Montessori model.

  • Vernay site cleanup plans reviewed

    It’s been seven years since Vernay Laboratories signed an order of consent with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to remediate the contamination centered on the former manufacturing facility on Dayton Street. Since that time, the company has moved its rubber parts production to Georgia and South Carolina, torn down the Dayton Street plant, welcomed Ed […]

  • Event to celebrate ‘Best Hometown’

    Yellow Springs is the best hometown because we embrace the spirit of community. We are a town where neighbors help one another in good times and bad, and where one person’s voice can truly make a tangible difference.

    Yellow Springs is the best hometown because you can be yourself, no matter where you are in the village.

  • Event to celebrate ‘Best Hometown’

    Yellow Springs is the best hometown because we embrace the spirit of community. We are a town where neighbors help one another in good times and bad, and where one person’s voice can truly make a tangible difference.

  • Presbies welcome new pastor

    Growing up in the farming community of Arcanum, Ohio, almost five decades ago, Doris Arnett Whitaker was surrounded by strong, church-going women who passed on to her their highest aspirations for a young girl: if she worked hard, she could grow up to be a nurse, a teacher, or a minister’s wife.

    Whitaker took that advice seriously, although she’s given it a significant twist. She’s not the minister’s wife. She’s the minister.

  • Levy supports local seniors

    Thanks to the senior service levy, Yellow Springs senior Grace Funderburg, right, can get help from local resident Mary Peterson to clean her home once a week and receive rides from Yellow Springs Senior Center volunteers to run errands. Voters will decide whether to replace the 1-mill Greene County senior services levy in the Nov. 3 election.

    Every Monday morning, 85-year old resident Grace Funderburg gets help cleaning her house on Lisa Lane. Local resident Mary Peterson comes over to vacuum and dust, and the two often share stories about the village they raised their children in. Several times a week Funderburg also gets a ride to town from a volunteer driver […]

  • Swine flu arrives in county

    As in most of the rest of the country, the H1N1 flu, or swine flu, has arrived in Greene County, according to Don Brannon, epidemiologist of the Greene County Combined Health Department in an interview this week. While Brannon had no information regarding specific numbers in Yellow Springs because those numbers are not being recorded, about 10 people with the flu have been hospitalized in the county this month, he said.

  • Top library hopes for support

    Call him crazy, but Greene County Public Library Director Karl Colón believes that the library ought to serve the taxpayers who support it. When the people said in a 2005 survey that they wanted more youth programs, better communication and a bigger collection, the Yellow Springs library started console game madness for teens, gussied up its newsletter and Web site and started ordering more books.

  • Bench talk gets new legs

    A recent mediated dialogue between local young people and downtown business owners has increased understanding between the two groups and will likely result in a new public bench downtown, Village Council members were told at their Oct. 5 meeting. “The message to the youth is that they’re important to the community and that we want […]

  • Mad as hell over health care

    Last Wednesday afternoon at the Emporium, a crowd of about 50 villagers stood up and yelled on cue, “I’m mad as hell, and I’m not gonna take it anymore!” Then they raised their right hands and took an oath to support a single payer health insurance system.

    “On my honor as a health care advocate,” they began in unison, “I will do everything I can to help us develop a system of payment that redirects all current health care monies, both public and private, into a single public fund that covers everyone.”

Weather forecast by WP Wunderground & Denver Snow Plowing