Village Life Section :: Page 78

  • Rwandans open up world for YS

    Teachers Fidele Havugimana and Tony Gasana, from left, back row; students Kelly Ngamije, Eugenia Uwamariya, front; and headmaster Brother Straton Malisaba, right, from Ecôle des Sciences secondary school in Byimana, Rwanda, are teaching and attending classes at YSHS for six weeks due to the efforts of retired Central State chemistry professor Al Schlueter.

    It was an ordinary night in the village. Traven was showing Tony — both Yellow Springs High School students — how to make Rice Crispy treats. Another student, Kelly, was doing homework alongside her brothers and sisters.

  • Marilyn’s story of wheel gratitude

    Longtime Yellow Springs resident Marilyn Van Eaton, after a long bout of illness, uses this recumbent bicycle to wheel around town and to regain her health. The bike was purchased after friends raised $1,000 from villagers so that Van Eaton could have a bike.

    “This will be a love letter to the village,” said Marilyn Van Eaton, her eyes filled with tears. The recent interview had to be stopped several times while she composed herself, describing the “long row to hoe” that has defined her life for so many years.

  • Zagory gets a kick out of football

    YSHS Class of 2004 valedictorian Aaron Zagory is the place kicker for the Stanford University football team. He is pictured here with his sister, Jessica Zagory, during a visit in Palo Alto, Calif.

    As the argument about the value of retaining a football program at Yellow Springs High School raged on in the community forum pages of the News in recent weeks, one of the school’s graduates was steady as a rock, kicking field goals and extra points for the Stanford University football team.

  • Travelers surf cultures, couches

    Kathleen Hotmer, left, and Judith Wolert-Maldonado of Yellow Springs are satisfied veterans of couch surfing, a new Internet-based way to travel by spending the night on the sofas of strangers. The women have found couch surfing inexpensive, safe and a good way to meet new people and experience different cultures.

    “I’ve been traveling since I was a baby,” said Judith Wolert-Maldonado as she sipped her tea at The Emporium. “My mom and dad came to the U.S. from Argentina in the late ’60s. I was born in ’70 and by seven months old I was flying back to Argentina with my parents.

  • Police charge YS resident with Timothy Harris murder

    After a lengthy investigation by the Yellow Springs Police Department, the Greene County Prosecutor last week charged Phillip K. Cordell with the 2004 murder of local resident Timothy Harris.

  • YSHS ‘Midsummer’ mischief, mayhem with a ’50s flare

    In their 1950s version of Shakespeare’s ‘A Midsummer Night’s Dream,’ Kelly Miller as Helena, center, is driven mad by her admirers, Demetrius, played by Max Fleishman, and Lysander, played by Adam Zaremsky, who is himself sought by Hermia, played by Zyna Bakari. The mischeivous Puck, Shelley Murphy, looks on from her perch. Performances will take place at Mills Lawn gym on Fridays and Saturdays, Nov. 14, 15, 21 and 22 at 8 p.m., and Sundays, Nov. 16 and 23, at 2 p.m.

    If Shakespeare had lived in the 1950s, how he would have dressed, where he would have lived and the way he would have set his stage is surely just what the Yellow Springs High School thespians have dreamed up for the fall production of A Midsummer Night’s Dream.

  • This hot little town is Coolsville

    Mary Kay Smith, left, and Kim Korkan, owners of The Winds, which was singled out in Budget Travel magazine’s article about the ‘10 Coolest Small Towns’ in America, are surprised at the attention the restaurant is receiving.

    Is there anyone among us who does not think Yellow Springs is cool? Now Budget Travel magazine has confirmed this distinction in its September issue by naming the village one of the “10 Coolest Small Towns” in America.

  • On Halloween, Gardner puts the ‘boo’ back into books

    Lucille Gardner shares a book with 7-year-old Sean Adams. She continues to share her passion for reading with children in novel ways, including inviting trick-or-treaters in for a snack and a book.

    “She may be hard of hearing but she listens to kids,” said Sue Hawkey of her friend and colleague, Lucille Gardner. “She really hears what kids have to say.” Hawkey taught fourth grade at Mills Lawn School from 2003 up until this past spring.

  • School serves up wisdom, skills

    The Heart of Joy Folkschool begins its mission of passing along life skills and wisdom with a ‘folkshop,’ Oct. 17–18, at the Glen Helen Outdoor Education Center. Shown left to right are organizers and contributors, front row, Eric Wolf, Kay Reimers; back row, Carolion, Suzanne Rudolf, Joe Cook.

    The Heart of Joy Folkschool, which has been quietly simmering on a back burner, is ready to be served. “It’s come from a lot of people,” said artist Carolion, one of the initial organizers of the school. “It’s been cooking and bubbling for months.”

  • Fall Street Fair: festing in the fall

    This fall the Yellow Springs Street Fair will be held downtown on Saturday, Oct. 11, 9 a.m.–5 p.m., with the Music Festival and Beer Garden, at the Bryan Community Center, running from noon to 7 p.m.

The forecast for 45387 by WP Wunderground