Village Life Section :: Page 73

  • Facing cancer, Colbert misses the mayhem of kids and dogs

    More than most of us, Shelley Colbert has spent her life caring for others. For the past 23 years she has cared for the youngest of villagers at her home. Mainly as a single parent, she raised two sons. And in recent years, her parents, who live in town, needed her attention in new ways.

  • Birds on the brain

    On a day with lots of wind, birding experts and watchers counting species for the third Make It Count for the Birds event in the Glen on Saturday, May 9, surpassed last year’s data by one. The group charted a total of 89 species of birds, including one Tennessee oven bird, a wilson, a barred owl, blue herons (immature shown, top right), and lots of magnolia warblers and Baltimore orioles everywhere. The 40 to 50 birders added several new bird species to this year’s list, including a black vulture (a piece of data that supports the northern movement that species has been making), a Canada warbler, a yellow breasted chat and a wild turkey that one birder from Illinois saw sitting on its nest. Perhaps it was the wind, or the clouds, or the fact that many migrants just decided to pass up the Glen in hopes of better weather in Canada, but Saturday was “a really tough year for finding birds out there,” according to Glen Director Nick Boutis, who added that almost every warbler and more than half the birds counted were single sightings. “In other words, if you’d looked the other direction or happened not to hear that chirp, you’d have missed it.”

    Copies of this and other photographs may be purchased from the News; please contact us via e-mail at ysnews {at} ysnews(.)com, or by phone, between 9:30 a.m. and 5: 30 p.m., Mon.–Fri. RELATED POSTS: Watching birds, helping the Glen The Glen in winter home to many birds — count on it State representatives call for […]

  • YSKP, the whole year ’round

    YSKP Education Coordinator Mary Kay Clark recently oversaw New Actors Club participants (left to right) Evelyn Greene, Ursula Kremer, Ana Smith, and Shekinah Williams as they brainstormed possible endings for their collaborative adaptation of Beatrix Potter’s The Tale of Jemima Puddle-Duck.

    Even with the loss of its Antioch Theater space last year, YS Kids Playhouse continues to build community through contemporary theater. Displaying its characteristic “the show must go on!” spirit and resourcefulness, the local arts organization has every intention to fulfill its mission of not only providing theater arts and arts education opportunities for Yellow Springs and surrounding communities, but to expand its programming year-round.

  • Loading dock brings sculptor to YS

    Woodworker, sculptor and architectural designer Tom Hawley works on a sculptural bowl in his workspace at Millworks Business Center. Hawley’s work is on display at The Cannery Art and Design Center in Dayton and the Malton Gallery in Cincinnati.

    Massive logs lay outside the artist’s workspace, quietly waiting their turn to be carved, chiseled, shaped, shaved, sanded, planed and polished into a gallery of finely finished forms. The logs were recently recovered from a fallen Catalpa tree on the grounds of the Westcott House in Springfield, a unique example of the prairie-style architecture made famous by Frank Lloyd Wright.

  • Glen Helen celebrates 80 years as a living green memorial

    Glen Helen Director Nick Boutis and 12 local birders saw and heard a phoebe, a yellow rumped warbler, a screech owl and what they guessed was a Cooper’s hawk soaring high above the trees on Sunday morning. The bird hike was a preview to the annual bird counting event, Make It Count for the Birds, to be held on Saturday, May 9, during the month the Glen will celebrate its 80th birthday.

    Morning may be considered a quiet time for humans, but for birds it’s all about chatting. Male red-winged blackbirds call to their drably dressed counterparts, downy woodpeckers impound their beaks for breakfast nibbles, and goldfinch streak through cedars in their chase as cardinals try to drown them all out with unsubtle piercing refrains.

  • Farmers corner new market

    Can there ever be too much locally grown, fresh fruit and vegetables in one town? Vendors at a new Yellow Springs farmers’ market think not, and they aim to give shoppers more variety by opening in the Corner Cone parking lot on Saturdays, just down the street from the farmers’ market at Kings Yard. Both markets open on May 2 and will continue Saturday mornings from 7 to 11:30 a.m. through the summer.

  • Baptist tea hits 50 with thanks

    In gratitude to the community for its support over the past 50 years, the First Baptist Church will celebrate the golden anniversary of its calendar tea event, which is now called the First Baptist Annual Tea, on Sunday, April 26, from 3 to 6 p.m. In this News photo from 1992, Jocelyn Robinson, Ernestine Lucas and Ruth Wright, holding Birch Robinson-Hubbuch, attended a tea at Yellow Springs High School.

    Some traditions don’t change, such as the raisin bars, spinach balls and heavenly tea cakes with orange glaze that Isabel Newman makes every year for the event known as the First Baptist Church Calendar Tea. But other traditions do, such as the fact that the Calendar Tea, which is celebrating its 50th anniversary this Sunday, April 26, 3–6 p.m., is no longer named after its 12 tables themed for each month of the year.

  • Saving the planet, a house at a time

    Local residents Bob Brecha, right, and Dan Rudolf, second from right, are starting netØhome, a new business that provides home energy audits. Shown at left is Mark Campbell, who will do the audits, and center, Libby Rudolf, who handles graphic design and support services. The business kicks off with a celebration this Saturday, April 18, at 7 p.m. at The Emporium.

    Most people want their homes to be more energy efficient, Bob Brecha and Dan Rudolf believe, but they just don’t know how to make the needed changes. “People don’t know where to start,” Brecha said in a recent interview.

  • That’s some long hare

    Patrick (aka “Brother Bear”) and Mindy Harney recently sat with their children, from left, Gracie, Elesha, Sophie and Molly on the steps outside Brother Bear’s Café, 118 Dayton Street. The café will be celebrating its grand opening Friday–Monday, April 17–20.

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  • Green Fair touts Earth care

    “We’re trying to change our lives,” event organizer Rob Content said in a recent interview. He looked at Jorie Sieck, a youth organizer, and added, “as grownups, this is a challenge.” Content thinks that events like the Earth Day Fair bring people together, and that working together is what makes personal change possible.

    Living Green co-owner C.J. Williams defines “green” as anything with a focus on sustainability that is good for the Earth and good for individuals. More than 20 tables representing green individuals, green businesses and green non-profits are confirmed for the day, she said.

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